have had few sources on which to draw

tesoke

Senior Member
USA
Persian
Hi, during the following sentences, from "Reviving the Female Canon" by Susan Price, I think that "on which" is superfluous. Am I wrong? Would you please explain it to me. Thanks.


Project Vox aims to address the lack of easy-to-find resources for faculty and students who have been eager to add women to their courses but have had few sources on which to draw.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It is fine as it is. You need ON at least, “to draw on” is a set phrase. If you only draw then it suggests artistic work rather than pulling on a resource, which is what “draw on” means here.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    No, it's not superfluous, Tesoke. You need either sources on which to draw [formal version] or sources to draw on [less formal version].

    Cross-posted.
     

    tesoke

    Senior Member
    USA
    Persian
    I thought that "on which" is a combination of Prepositions + Relative Pronouns, which works like a "Relative Adverb". Though, I thought that the sentence does not need a "Relative Adverb". Am I wrong?
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    "...have few sources to draw" = "...have few sources to sketch" or "...few sources to pull."

    "...have few sources on which to draw" = "have few sources to draw from."
     

    tesoke

    Senior Member
    USA
    Persian
    Thank you, but previously I had read about using "Prepositions + Relative Pronouns" only as "Relative Adverb". Would you please explain about the structural role of "on which" in the mentioned sentence? Thanks for any help.
     
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