have in regard

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Ben pan

Senior Member
chinese
That is not what the traditional logicians have in regard. (from a conversation with a teacher)
Possibilities. 1. “have in regard” here means “consider”. 2. It means “hold in respect”. 3. It is a wrong expression. Which one is closer to the truth?
 
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  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I suspect that it means 'have in mind'. It seems a little unusual to me.

    Could we have a little more context, and perhaps the source of the quotation. These would help us to answer your question properly.
     

    Ben pan

    Senior Member
    chinese
    The context is a discussion about Kant's transcendental logic: what is its characteristic, how is it different from the old logic, whether it is still related with in some way and even implied in modern logic. I think your explanation is right. Since the teacher who talked with me was not a native speaker, I just wonder whether it is good English.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    >> I just wonder whether it is good English

    I don't think it is. You can find the words 'have in regard' together, and in this order, but they'd usually be followed by 'of' or 'to'.
     
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