Have my shoes shined

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Context and Background:

I brought only one pair of shoes to Beijing and I stayed there for almost a week, and the pair of shoes became dim. I then asked “Siri”:

Where can I have my shoes shined?

Is it natural to say it?

Thoughts:

I looked up “shoeshine”, and I found “polish”, I guess my new version is better “Where can I have my shoes polished?”, but I am afraid it still sounds weird.

Thanks a lot
 
  • RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    The whole idea sounds weird to me - I can't even remember the last time I saw a shoeshine stand. :)

    Both sentences sound fine to me, tho I would be more likely to use get rather than have.

    And you want dull in your first sentence, not dim.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    The whole idea sounds weird to me - I can't even remember the last time I saw a shoeshine stand. :)

    Both sentences sound fine to me, tho I would be more likely to use get rather than have.

    And you want dull in your first sentence, not dim.
    Thanks a lot. We still have such stands here. And your comments also seem to be a bit surprising for me! Where do you get your shoes shined, though?
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Shining them ourselves, at home, is definitely the norm in the US. The only times I've ever had my shoes shined by someone else was when I was in the navy - I never could master the art of shining dress shoes to Navy standards, so I asked friends to do it for me.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Let's try to focus on the language question.

    I would expect someone to ask, "Where can I get my shoes shined?"

    I wouldn't expect someone to use 'polished' in this context.
    On the other hand, I would expect people to say 'polish' when they are talking about what they do themselves at home. :) ('Shine' works there too.)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I am a little less troubled by have as opposed to get. I think this construction is not uncommon in BrE.

    From Oxford Dictionaries:
    [WITH PAST PARTICIPLE] Cause (something) to be done for one by someone else:
    • it is advisable to have your carpet laid by a professional
    • Other staff will be coming in with bad hair and one teacher is having her hair dyed by the pupils.
    • We're having a small, flat roof added as part of our loft extension.
    • Surely in order to have one's lung cancer treated, one has to, er, go to a hospital and ask to be seen?
     
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