Have never gone to France

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sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
I have never been to France before.
I have never gone to France before.

Self-made

Hi,
Are both OK?

Thank you.
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Been is much better. It is the word we usually use for an experience that includes going and coming back.
    (I suppose you are talking about this kind of experience, and not just the going part.)
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    In what context or sentence it is common to use "have/has never gone to ..." ?
    Can you make an example, please?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In old English, there were 3 (possibly 4) verbs that eventually merged together and formed the Modern English verb "to be". One of the verbs was wesan, which originally meant "to spend time or stay in a place".

    OED:
    The Germanic antecedent of Old English wesan was probably originally a full verb, [...] meaning ‘to remain, to exist’; compare the senses of Indo-European cognates such as Sanskrit vas-
    This then created one of the meanings of the verb to be and thus "I have never been to France before" can be expressed as "I have never remained or spent time or been present in France".

    If you say "I have never gone to France [before]", you are saying that you have never travelled to France. If you have never travelled to France, then it is impossible for you to have stayed there.

    Thus both of your sentences carry the same meaning.

    However, in use, you would be more likely to say "I have never gone to France before" if you were planning on travelling to France and referring to the journey.

    You would be more likely to say "I have never been to France before" if you were anticipating staying for a little time in France.
     

    MargaretAlbert

    New Member
    English
    In old English, there were 3 (possibly 4) verbs that eventually merged together and formed the Modern English verb "to be". One of the verbs was wesan, which originally meant "to spend time or stay in a place".

    OED:

    This then created one of the meanings of the verb to be and thus "I have never been to France before" can be expressed as "I have never remained or spent time or been present in France".

    If you say "I have never gone to France [before]", you are saying that you have never travelled to France. If you have never travelled to France, then it is impossible for you to have stayed there.

    Thus both of your sentences carry the same meaning.

    However, in use, you would be more likely to say "I have never gone to France before" if you were planning on travelling to France and referring to the journey.

    You would be more likely to say "I have never been to France before" if you were anticipating staying for a little time in France.
    Wouldn’t one skip using “before “ since there’s no verb after this last word?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I might use "never gone ... before" if I were talking about doing a sport or activity:

    I've never gone skiing before.
    I've never gone shopping without buying some item I don't really need.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    A. But when you go to London, how do you go? By plane or by car?
    B. Well, I have never gone to London, because I have never left London.
    :)
     
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