''Have wind speeds''???

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kenny4528

Senior Member
Mandarin, Taiwan
Hi, dear all

These spinning clouds of dust and debris have wind speeds reaching 300mph.

This sentence is excerpted from a essay ''Tornadoes''.

I was wondering if ''have'' is an appropriate verb to use in this sentence?
Can we say that some natural disaster like Typhoons or Hurricanes have
wind speed? It sounds weird to me because it seems to personify them.

Many thanks.
 
  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    The verb "to have" is such a common verb in English that it does not personify the possessor:
    • This table has a scratch.
    • Her house has three bathrooms.
    • My dog has fleas.
    Therefore, saying that a tornado has wind speeds of up to X miles per hour is extremely common.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    The verb "to have" is such a common verb in English that it does not personify the possessor:
    • This table has a scratch.
    • Her house has three bathrooms.
    • My dog has fleas.
    Therefore, saying that a tornado has wind speeds of up to X miles per hour is extremely common.
    Hi, thanks. Is there any other verb can be used alternatively?
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    no...tornadoes don't really blow

    edit: well i guess they do, but "tornadoes don't blow at 300 mph."
     

    mimiluau

    Senior Member
    USA
    English-UK
    Tornado winds blow though so you can say:

    The tornado winds were blowing at X mph...

    Or in the present tense:

    Tornado winds blow (on average) at Xmph
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    "has" is the most common way of expressing this idea. You could say, "These spinning clouds of dust and debris sustain wind speeds reaching 300mph."

    There may also be other verbs you could use, but I can't think of any right now.

    Another commonly used form is to say, "These spinning clouds of dust and debris with wind speeds reaching 300 mph ...." but then you'd need to add a verb at the end of this phrase: "These spinning clouds of dust and debris with wind speeds reaching 300 mph are frequently seen in the Midwestern United States."

     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    I can't think of any other word to use in your original sentence without changing the rest of the sentence.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    "has" is the most common way of expressing this idea. You could say, "These spinning clouds of dust and debris sustain wind speeds reaching 300mph."

    There may also be other verbs you could use, but I can't think of any right now.

    Another commonly used form is to say, "These spinning clouds of dust and debris with wind speeds reaching 300 mph ...." but then you'd need to add a verb at the end of this phrase: "These spinning clouds of dust and debris with wind speeds reaching 300 mph are frequently seen in the Midwestern United States."
    Good point, I got it.:thumbsup:
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    It is very uncommon to speak of "tornado winds blowing" in AE. "To blow" would seldom be used in any official or scientific context. You might use "to reach" however: "These spinning clouds of dust and debris reach wind speeds approaching 300mph."
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Thank you all for these great answers!
    Joelline really came up with a word I had ever seen before-reach sounds familiar to me.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Hi, dear all

    These spinning clouds of dust and debris have wind speeds reaching 300mph.

    This sentence is excerpted from a essay ''Tornadoes''.


    Many thanks.
    A tornado [or hurricane, or cyclone, or typhoon] has two speeds.

    One is the speed of the wind rotating in the tornado, and the other is the speed at which the system moves over the ground.

    So you can say that a tornado has a wind speed of 200 mph, and a ground speed of 30 mph.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    A tornado [or hurricane, or cyclone, or typhoon] has two speeds.

    One is the speed of the wind rotating in the tornado, and the other is the speed at which the system moves over the ground.

    So you can say that a tornado has a wind speed of 200 mph, and a ground speed of 30 mph.
    Good info.Thanks.:)
     
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