Have you <already> bought a present for your grandpa?

stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

What is the difference between "Have you already bought a present for your grandpa" and "Have you bought a present for your grandpa"?

Thank you very much.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "Already" implies that the speaker knows the listener plans to do this action, and is only asking whether it is completed or not done yet.

    The sentence without "already" can be used in that situation, or in other situations where the speaker does not know this.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Have you bought a present for your grandpa? presents no problems. It's a straightforward question.

    Have you already bought a present for your grandpa? requires a particular context if it is not to sound odd.

    One possible context:
    (Father and son are looking at a shop window display.)
    Father: That's a very fine walking stick, and not too expensive. It would make a good present for your grandfather's birthday. You don't agree? Why? Have you already bought a present for grandpa?
     
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