Have you? / Do you have?

Alpha0ne

Senior Member
England English/Spanish
Hi all,
I was wondering if any kind soul could tell me which of these two is correct?
Someone walks in to a shop and asks the shop assistant: Have you any sugar? Or do they say: Do you have any sugar? Which is better?
Thanks you in advance,
Nick :)
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Alpah0ne said:
    Hi all,
    I was wondering if any kind soul could tell me which of these two is correct?
    Someone walks in to a shop and asks the shop assistant: Have you any sugar? Or do they say: Do you have any sugar? Which is better?
    Thanks you in advance,
    Nick :)

    Hola A1-

    Neither is better. Both are correct. Most Americans would say, "Do you have any sugar?" but some of us would use the other question.

    It's really a question of stylistic preference, rather than grammar.

    ciao,
    Cuchufléte
     

    Alpha0ne

    Senior Member
    England English/Spanish
    cuchufléte said:
    Hola A1-

    Neither is better. Both are correct. Most Americans would say, "Do you have any sugar?" but some of us would use the other question.

    It's really a question of stylistic preference, rather than grammar.

    ciao,
    Cuchufléte
    I have spoken English for many years, and never asked myself why, then the other day a Spanish friend asked me why? and I did not know what to answer. They both sound good, but then, English speakers often use grammatically incorrect phrases and don't realize it.
    Thanks for your trouble.
    Regards,
    :)
     

    Magg

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    Alpah0ne said:
    Have you any sugar? Or do they say: Do you have any sugar? Which is better?
    Nick :)

    Also, Britsh people say: Have you got any sugar? It would be Cuchuflete's American version of have you any sugar?, but with 'got'.
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Magg, I was thinking of that, too. I've never heard 'have you any sugar?', I have heard of 'have you got any sugar?' instead, in British English that should be fine.
     

    cathy

    Member
    Australia - English
    "have you any sugar" sounds very old-fashioned to me. I would use either "have you got any sugar" or "do you have any sugar"
     

    Sextus

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    As far as I know, grammar books accept the three of them. The form "have got" is mainly English, but some Americans also use it particularly in positive statements. The form "have" alone in questions and negative statements is also American, but it's not very common. Maybe, as Cathy remarks, it's old-fashioned.

    Cheers,

    Sextus
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    I was taught several (many many!!) years ago that in BrE you say "Have you got?". Then teachers said that the AmE "Do you have ?" is catching on among English Speakers, no matter if they are Br or Am. :)
     

    Chaucer

    Senior Member
    US inglés/español
    Alpah0ne said:
    I have spoken English for many years, and never asked myself why, then the other day a Spanish friend asked me why? and I did not know what to answer. They both sound good, but then, English speakers often use grammatically incorrect phrases and don't realize it.
    Thanks for your trouble.
    Regards,
    :)

    Have you any sugar? is not grammatically incorrect.
    Eat you any sugar? yes.

    I apologize for asserting that without giving specific support or theory, but I know it has to do with auxiliary verbs being economized through "inverse colocation"? in word order? syntax?

    Not old-fashioned:
    Have you no inkling of what you've done?
    Have they complaints? (quite common phrase)
     

    cathy

    Member
    Australia - English
    Chaucer said:
    Not old-fashioned:
    Have you no inkling of what you've done?
    Have they complaints? (quite common phrase)
    Sorry, they still sound old-fashioned to me! I've never heard "have they complaints", but then again I am Australian :)
     

    shoal22

    Member
    uk english
    jacinta said:
    I agree with Cathy. I've never heard this.

    I would say,"Do they have any complaints?"

    I agree wholeheartedly.Have they complaints????? Have you any idea how stilted that sounds Chaucer? :D
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    < Topic drift. >

    One thing I do find seriously weird is the following construction (as heard in American films, tv programmes):

    -- Have you got any questions?
    -- Yes, I do / No, I don't.
    (The BrE answer is: Yes, I have / No, I haven't)

    I've even heard:

    -- You've got to do it
    -- No, I don't.

    How "standard" is this in AmE?

    F
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Chaucer

    Senior Member
    US inglés/español
    Sometimes when someone points out something you've never really considered or been alerted to-- like a song they play for you that you'd never heard before; or an unknown word or expression (in this instance) they tell you about; or someone else's unusual habit that you'd never noticed before in that person; or other such examples of things in the environment-- have you not ever had the experience of suddenly noticing yourself afterward somewhere, some place noticing it?

    Well, maybe you'll hear the phrases somewhere. Otherwise: I think I'm losing my mind (just being humorous).

    But no one has been at a meeting or briefing where the speaker has said, "Has anyone any complaints?" or "Has anyone here have any questions?"

    Thanks for the feedback, though.

    P.S The issue of "old-fashion-ness" would still be an issue should any of you hear it. Ummm: I guess it might sound old-fashion. I don't know. When people say it, when I say it, it sounds so natural. I'll get over it.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Chaucer said:
    Sometimes when someone points out something you've never really considered or been alerted to-- like a song they play for you that you'd never heard before; or an unknown word or expression (in this instance) they tell you about; or someone else's unusual habit that you'd never noticed before in that person; or other such examples of things in the environment-- have you not ever had the experience of suddenly noticing yourself afterward somewhere, some place noticing it?

    Well, maybe you'll hear the phrases somewhere. Otherwise: I think I'm losing my mind (just being humorous).

    But no one has been at a meeting or briefing where the speaker has said, "Has anyone any complaints?" or "Has anyone here have any questions?"

    Thanks for the feedback, though.

    P.S The issue of "old-fashion-ness" would still be an issue should any of you hear it. Ummm: I guess it might sound old-fashion. I don't know. When people say it, when I say it, it sounds so natural. I'll get over it.




    In fact, I've heard "Any questions?" just that. No "have" included. "Any queries?" :)

    But in doing some research in my grammar books, I've just found that in formal BrE these short question and negative forms are possible (though as I said, formal). They are not used in AmE.

    Eg,

    Have you an appointment?

    Birmingham has not the charm of York or Edinburg
     

    razakazmii

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    << Moderator's note: This new question has been added to an existing thread. Please scroll up and read from the top. >>

    Hello,

    I have a interrogative tense which is,

    1. Have you two cars?

    I believe it is grammatical correct but it does not sound natural while speaking it, so, can we add 'DO YOU' so that it might sounds natural. Like:

    1. Do you have two cars?

    Is it correct from both grammatical and speaking perspective?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Johnny519

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Yes, do you have two cars sounds better and is correct, have you two cars is not complete and is not correct as a question.
     

    RocketScience

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It can work if said as in your first example, but it would usually be spoken with a very high pitch to stress that it is a question, and even then, there are limited contexts (almost certainly as a follow-up question to something) where it would sound okay.

    I would use the second example.
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    Yes, do you have two cars sounds better and is correct, have you two cars is not complete and is not correct as a question.

    Why is "Have you.." 'not complete'? "Have you", employed in this manner, can be traced right back to the earliest stages of the English language.
    There have been many threads which deal with this topic (or close to it). Here is one.

    It seems to be that the construction "Have you...(a pen, a dictionary, a car, two cars etc.)" is used more in BE than in AE (particularly in the so-called 'Celtic fringes').

    Even so, I believe that "have you" would be employed as standard in expressions like "Have you no shame?" by all speakers.
     

    Johnny519

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    OK, if you insist that " have you two cars" is a complete construction as a question. I can not say anything, and I feel it sounds weird if someone asks a question with that pattern.

    I just think it's better and appropriate to use" have you got two cars" or "do you have two cars" or " you have two cars" with a rising pitch on cars, this will make it sound you're asking a question.
     
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