Have you ever GONE/BEEN parachuting?

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kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
We are all familiar with the difference between "She's gone to Paris." meaning "she is in Paris now.", and "She's been to Paris." meaning "She's here with us, not in Paris." But, what happens when we "use go + ing"?

I'm asking because I've found both ways when the person is right here with us; I mean, someone is talking to someone and one asks the other one the question either with GONE or BEEN. Does the difference between BEEN and GONE disappear when we use go + ing?

Native English speakers of the world: What do you think?
 
  • Trinibeens

    Senior Member
    NYC
    U.S. English
    We are all familiar with the difference between "She's gone to Paris." meaning "she is in Paris now.", and "She's been to Paris." meaning "She's here with us, not in Paris." But, what happens when we "use go + ing"?

    I'm asking because I've found both ways when the person is right here with us; I mean, someone is talking to someone and one asks the other one the question either with GONE or BEEN. Does the difference between BEEN and GONE disappear when we use go + ing?

    Native English speakers of the world: What do you think?
    No, the difference does not disappear.

    In AE, the question "Where have you been all week?" would be answered, "I've been parachuting."

    The question, "Have you ever done anything exciting?" could be answered, "I've gone parachuting," or "I went parachuting."

    The question, "Where did you go last week?" would be answered, "I went parachuting."
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    In general Trinibeens, I agree with you. However, your phrase 'I've gone parachuting' sounds rather odd. I don't think you could ever use 'gone' with the first person. In answer to your posed question, I would have replied: 'I've parachuted' or 'I've made some parachute jumps'.
     

    Vinlander

    Senior Member
    Canada, American English (mostly)
    We are all familiar with the difference between "She's gone to Paris." meaning "she is in Paris now.", and "She's been to Paris." meaning "She's here with us, not in Paris." But, what happens when we "use go + ing"?

    I'm asking because I've found both ways when the person is right here with us; I mean, someone is talking to someone and one asks the other one the question either with GONE or BEEN. Does the difference between BEEN and GONE disappear when we use go + ing?

    Native English speakers of the world: What do you think?
    No, "She's going to Paris" means that she is either presently travelling to Paris or that she will go to Paris sometime in the future. It definitely means that, in terms of the trip to Paris in question, she has not arrived there yet.

    Vinlander
     

    Esteven

    Member
    USA, English
    I agree with scrivener. As a question, either one sounds fine to me. I might be slightly more likely to use "been" than "gone".

    "Have you ever gone parachuting?" = "Have you ever been parachuting?"
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In general Trinibeens, I agree with you. However, your phrase 'I've gone parachuting' sounds rather odd. I don't think you could ever use 'gone' with the first person. In answer to your posed question, I would have replied: 'I've parachuted' or 'I've made some parachute jumps'.
    I disagree. "Gone" is often used in speech with the first person.

    Message on voicemail: "Sorry, hon. Dinner is going to be late. I've gone (out) shopping with some friends and we don't expect to be back until after 7 p.m."

    I've gone hiking in the mountains, but I've never actually gone mountain-climbing.

    I've gone native. :)

    Silly sign: "I've gone to find myself."
     

    Trinibeens

    Senior Member
    NYC
    U.S. English
    In general Trinibeens, I agree with you. However, your phrase 'I've gone parachuting' sounds rather odd. I don't think you could ever use 'gone' with the first person. In answer to your posed question, I would have replied: 'I've parachuted' or 'I've made some parachute jumps'.
    As JamesM commented, "gone" is used all the time. There is even a colloquialism that includes it, "Now I've gone and done it!"

    What sounds strange to me is the term 'parachuting'. In AE we would almost certainly say "skydiving", not 'parachuting'.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    But skydiving and parachuting are entirely different as far as I am aware. Skydiving implies a long free fall prior to opening the chute whereas in parachuting, the chute opens almost immediately after you have jumped.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    I disagree. "Gone" is often used in speech with the first person.

    Message on voicemail: "Sorry, hon. Dinner is going to be late. I've gone (out) shopping with some friends and we don't expect to be back until after 7 p.m."

    I've gone hiking in the mountains, but I've never actually gone mountain-climbing.

    I've gone native. :)

    Silly sign: "I've gone to find myself."
    Yes, JamesM, you're right of course, but only with regard to a message and not in a live conversation. Personally I would never say 'I've gone hiking..., etc.', but rather 'I've been ...'
     

    Trinibeens

    Senior Member
    NYC
    U.S. English
    But skydiving and parachuting are entirely different as far as I am aware. Skydiving implies a long free fall prior to opening the chute whereas in parachuting, the chute opens almost immediately after you have jumped.
    Well, I learn something new every day! :) The only reference I have for the term 'parachuting' is from old war movies, i.e. "The men parachuted down into the valley." I wasn't aware people engaged in the activity for entertainment.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    I am disagreeing. I'm saying that it's quite common in live spoken conversation in AE.
    Then I would say we're back to the AE/BE thing again!

    Yes, Trinibeens, I believe people still go parachuting for fun, at least in the UK and I believe here in Argentina, too.
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Whether is parachuting or skydiving is irrelevant. What I'd like to know is whether English native speakers use the question "Have you ever gone + ing?" or not, when they're talking face to face to someone. If we follow the rule the only possible face-to-face question would be "Have you ever been parachuting/skydiving/skiing?" because both people are talking to each other home -for example-. So, let me rephrase it: You are having some friends home for dinner and when you finish having dinner you ask a friend of yours "Mike, have you ever gone skydiving?" According to the grammar rule that question would be wrong, and shoud be rephrased as "Have you ever been skydiving?"
    I've heard both ways in conversation between English native speakers. As you know in the same situation I couldn't ask Mike: "Have you ever gone to Paris?" if we were having dinner home in California; I'd have to say: "Have you ever been to Paris? So, do we have to apply the same rule to "go to + a place" and to "go + ing", or only to "go + a place"?

    Thanks a lot:)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Whether is parachuting or skydiving is irrelevant. What I'd like to know is whether English native speakers use the question "Have you ever gone + ing?" or not, when they're talking face to face to someone. If we follow the rule the only possible face-to-face question would be "Have you ever been parachuting/skydiving/skiing?" because both people are talking to each other home -for example-. So, let me rephrase it: You are having some friends home for dinner and when you finish having dinner you ask a friend of yours "Mike, have you ever gone skydiving?" According to the grammar rule that question would be wrong, and shoud be rephrased as "Have you ever been skydiving?"
    I've heard both ways in conversation between English native speakers. As you know in the same situation I couldn't ask Mike: "Have you ever gone to Paris?" if we were having dinner home in California; I'd have to say: "Have you ever been to Paris? So, do we have to apply the same rule to "go to + a place" and to "go + ing", or only to "go + a place"?

    Thanks a lot:)
    I'd say that the feedback you've gotten so far indicates that there may be an AE/BE difference here.

    All of these questions would be quite normal in AE, in my experience:

    Have you ever gone fishing/hiking/south of the border/camping?

    ("Have you ever gone to Paris" sounds odd to me, so I don't include it here)
    (To me, it's "gone" plus "activity")

    Are you going fishing/hiking/south of the border/camping/to Paris?

    Will you be going fishing/hiking/south of the border/camping/to Paris?

    Do you go fishing/hiking/south of the border/camping/to Paris often?
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Yeah, exactly. the difference only occurs when we use the present perfect: have/has + past participle. And in my perception it only applies when we use "gone/been to + a place"; when we talk about activities and we use the present perfect, both ways sound correct to me. So, "have you ever gone fishing?" and "Have you ever been fishing?" sound grammatically correct to me.

    Cheers.:)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yeah, exactly. the difference only occurs when we use the present perfect: have/has + past participle. And in my perception it only applies when we use "gone/been to + a place"; when we talk about activities and we use the present perfect, both ways sound correct to me. So, "have you ever gone fishing?" and "Have you ever been fishing?" sound grammatically correct to me.

    Cheers.:)
    Whether it's grammatically correct or not was not your question. You asked if English native speakers actually say it to each other, face to face. The AE speakers have responded that they do, but as far as I can see the BE speakers have not said that they say it.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    I'd say that the feedback you've gotten so far indicates that there may be an AE/BE difference here.

    All of these questions would be quite normal in AE, in my experience:

    Have you ever gone fishing/hiking/south of the border/camping?

    ("Have you ever gone to Paris" sounds odd to me, so I don't include it here)
    (To me, it's "gone" plus "activity")

    Are you going fishing/hiking/south of the border/camping/to Paris?

    Will you be going fishing/hiking/south of the border/camping/to Paris?

    Do you go fishing/hiking/south of the border/camping/to Paris often?
    I would agree with all of that. As far as the AE/BE difference is concerned, I wouldn't like to be as presumptuous as to say that no BE speakers use that structure, but I don't think it is the more usual.
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Of course. To me, "grammatically" means people use it in everyday conversation. Actually I also use both forms in conversation, but kept wondering if people thought I was making a conversational mistake!!!
    Thansk JamesM
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    No, the difference does not disappear.

    In AE, the question "Where have you been all week?" would be answered, "I've been parachuting."

    The question, "Have you ever done anything exciting?" could be answered, "I've gone parachuting," or "I went parachuting."

    The question, "Where did you go last week?" would be answered, "I went parachuting."
    But if you can answer "I've gone parachuting" the difference disappears because in the same conversation the following exchange "Have you ever been to Paris?" "Yes, I've gone to Paris twice." would be incorrect. You should say "I've been to Paris twice."
     

    Trinibeens

    Senior Member
    NYC
    U.S. English
    Whether is parachuting or skydiving is irrelevant. What I'd like to know is whether English native speakers use the question "Have you ever gone + ing?" or not, when they're talking face to face to someone. If we follow the rule the only possible face-to-face question would be "Have you ever been parachuting/skydiving/skiing?" because both people are talking to each other home -for example-. So, let me rephrase it: You are having some friends home for dinner and when you finish having dinner you ask a friend of yours "Mike, have you ever gone skydiving?" According to the grammar rule that question would be wrong, and shoud be rephrased as "Have you ever been skydiving?"
    I've heard both ways in conversation between English native speakers. As you know in the same situation I couldn't ask Mike: "Have you ever gone to Paris?" if we were having dinner home in California; I'd have to say: "Have you ever been to Paris? So, do we have to apply the same rule to "go to + a place" and to "go + ing", or only to "go + a place"?

    Thanks a lot:)
    Just a small additional note--Less educated AE NYC natives use "been" and "gone" with places, as well as with activities. "Have you ever gone to Paris?" would be acceptable usage for them, if they were not in Paris at the time. In general, they use "gone" when they're speaking of a place other than the one they are currently in. If they were in Brooklyn they would ask a Californian via telephone, "Have you ever been to Brooklyn?" But if they were in California, they would ask, "Have you ever gone to Brooklyn?" In other words, gone implies you have/had to leave here to "go" there.

    I don't know if this applies to the rest of the U.S.
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    I found the answer in Longman Dictionary of Common Errors New Edition p 149. It says that in American English gone can be used instead of been when we are talking about places. So, it was a British American/English thing after all; that's why I kept hearing both uses!!!
     

    Trinibeens

    Senior Member
    NYC
    U.S. English
    I found the answer in Longman Dictionary of Common Errors New Edition p 149. It says that in American English gone can be used instead of been when we are talking about places. So, it was a British American/English thing after all; that's why I kept hearing both uses!!!
    So glad you cleared that up and that we haven't all gone crazy. ;)
     
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