Have you <got>? ... do you have?

cfu507

Senior Member
Hebrew
Hi,
When I want to ask someone if he has any brothers, children, car, wife...
how should I ask him:
Have you got any brothers (or children)? Do you have any brothers (or children)?
Have you got any car? or Do you have a car?
Have you got any wife? or Do you have a wife?

Thanks
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Hello, cfu507, and welcome to the forum!

    I would say, "Do you have" (or, in a rush and speaking casually, just "you have") for all your examples. I've heard people say, "have you got", though, and I wouldn't be confused by it.

    Just a note:

    "Have you got a car?"
    "Have you got a wife?"
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Hi,
    When I want to ask someone if he has any brothers, children, car, wife...
    how should I ask him:
    Have you got any brothers (or children)? Do you have any brothers (or children)?:tick: I would prefer the one checked/ticked, but you should say "brothers and sisters" unless there is a good reason to mean only brothers.
    Have you got any car?:cross: or Do you have a car? :tick:
    Have you got any wife?:cross: or Do you have a wife? :cross: I would suggest "Are you married?" there is something not quite polite about "Do you have a wife," I feel (see below).
    The "any" in these last is wrong, you could replace it with "a wife" etc. however, you should avoid using "got" where possible.
    Having made these corrections and comments, however, I think I should warn you that you risk impoliteness when asking these questions, as there are important cultural considerations. Depending on circumstances these questions may be rude or insensitive. I think the only one likely to be neutral is "Do you have any brothers and sisters?" If asking about a car, you might be better to assume that the person has a car, and ask something like "What car do you drive?" I think someone who does not drive a car will not mind the assumption and simply tell you they don't have one; they may even be proud of the fact.
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    First, Thanks again to both of you.

    Matching Mole, thank you also for your advices about (or regarding) good manners. It is very important thing to know.
     
    If asking about a car, you might be better to assume that the person has a car, and ask something like "What car do you drive?" I think someone who does not drive a car will not mind the assumption and simply tell you they don't have one; they may even be proud of the fact.

    I disagree with this. Thre are any number of people who do not drive cars, and they do not drive them for all sorts of reasons. In New York City, 3/4 of the households in Manhattan and 2/3 of the households in Brooklyn do not have automobiles. While there is no reason to be ashamed of the fact, I don't think many people are "proud" of the fact that keeping an automobile in the city is an expensive luxury which they cannot afford. It would therefor be much more polite to ask "Do you have a car?" rather than taking it for granted that because the questioner has one, everyone else must be in similar circumstances.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Apologies for whisking these posts around for the last few minutes. There are many previous threads on closely-related topics. You can find them by using the WordReference Dictionary Look-up (top of this page) to search for
    I have got
     
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    Flash3

    Senior Member
    United States and American English
    Having made these corrections and comments, however, I think I should warn you that you risk impoliteness when asking these questions, as there are important cultural considerations. Depending on circumstances these questions may be rude or insensitive. I think the only one likely to be neutral is "Do you have any brothers and sisters?" If asking about a car, you might be better to assume that the person has a car, and ask something like "What car do you drive?" I think someone who does not drive a car will not mind the assumption and simply tell you they don't have one; they may even be proud of the fact.
    Interesting. I would say "Do you have any brothers or sisters?"
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Well, you could, but logically this doesn't cover all possibilities (i.e. having both) and I therefore find it slightly awkward; in any case, in my experience, saying "brothers and sisters" is the usual way of framing this question.
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    Do you have any brothers or sisters?
    Do you have any children?
    Do you have a car?
    Do you have a wife? (But "are you married?" sounds less weird.)

    I think "got" could sound fine but I feel like it's more of a British thing. One of my teachers speaks BE and he says "got" more than the average AE person.
     

    min300

    Senior Member
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    Hi,
    When I want to ask someone if he has any brothers, children, car, wife...
    how should I ask him:
    Have you got any brothers (or children)? Do you have any brothers (or children)?
    Have you got any car? or Do you have a car?
    Have you got any wife? or Do you have a wife?

    Thanks

    Hi,

    Welcome to the forum:).

    Both 'have you got' and 'Do you have' are correct. 'Have got' is British and 'Do you have' is more American.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [...]
    Both 'have you got' and 'Do you have' are correct. 'Have got' is British and 'Do you have' is more American.
    I see that I need to put in a plea for the mid-Atlantic version here. There are many BE-speakers who would not normally use either of these; we don't all use got. So my natural version of this question type is either "Have you ... ?" or "Do you have ... ?"
    Have you any brothers or sisters?
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I see that I need to put in a plea for the mid-Atlantic version here. There are many BE-speakers who would not normally use either of these; we don't all use got. So my natural version of this question type is either "Have you ... ?" or "Do you have ... ?"
    Have you any brothers or sisters?

    I agree with you about this Panj., but I also agree with those who say it makes a difference what you are asking about, or saying you have.

    Have you any brothers or sisters? Yes, important to use this form, because got here almost suggests possession.

    Having said that, I must add that I'd never say have you a sore throat? It would have to be have you got a sore throat? Even do you have a sore throat? sounds a bit precious, though I'd certainly say do you have a throat pastille? or have you any cough mixture?
     

    min300

    Senior Member
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    this question type is either "Have you ... ?" or "Do you have ... ?"
    Have you any brothers or sisters?

    Hi Panjandrum,

    What about a negative sentence. Do you think it is all right to say ' I haven't any brothers or sisters'. If yes, it means 'got' is somehow optional here?

    Thanks
     

    pandammonium

    New Member
    UK
    GB English
    I'd say:
    1. Have you got any brothers and sisters?
    2. Have you got any children?
    3. Have you got a car?
    4. Are you married?
    5. I haven't got any brothers or sisters.

    Notes:
    1-3. I think saying Have you any... sounds too formal for every day speech. It might be something you might say to someone you've only just met and are trying to be very polite to, but really, to me, it sounds a bit odd.
    4. I wouldn't ask anyone if they have a wife: it sounds a bit rude, as was mentioned earlier. [I notice I didn't write got then. Interesting.]
    5. To answer the question about the negative statement, it's the same for either negative or positive for me.

    Ooh, I've just had a thought. AE tends to use gotten as the past participle, whereas in in BE, we use got.
    I had got some milk from the shop earlier.
    I had gotten some milk from the shop earlier.
    Maybe this is the reason for the difference in the usage as described here. I don't think anyone would want the past participle gotten in these questions, would they?
    Have you gotten a car?
    That just sounds weird, even taking into account the weirdness of the gotten to my British ears. I could see that meaning 'have you recently acquired a car?' but not 'do you own a car?', however.

    What do you think?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Many, many years ago when I was in the primary school grades in Chicago (USA), most of the students used "got" and the teacher was horrified. We were trained that whenever a student said "have got," we got up and pointed a finger at him/her. Whether that tendency was a result of many pupils coming from German-speaking homes, I cannot say.

    To my ear, nobody will notice if you say "I have" instead of "I have got."

    The verb "get" is one of those English words (such as "do") that have many meanings, particularly in colloquial use. The following come to mind:

    "Get up!" (Arise)
    "Do I get to go" (Do I have permission to go?)
    "Get serious!" (Become serious).
    "Get real!" (You are out of touch)
    "Do you get it?" (Do you understand?)
    "A go-getter." (An achiever)
    "Get" also is a rather old term for an animal's progeny
    "I've got to go!" (I should go)
    A "getter" also is a metallic substance, such as tantalum, deposited on the walls of a vacuum tube (valve) or other such item to trap random molecules of gas.
    "How do I get to Portland?" (Give me directions to Portland)
    "He got drunk!" (He became intoxicated).
    "Did you get a little." (Was your attempt at seduction successful?)
    "She got there late." (She arrived late).
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    As usual, questions like these float around in my head for days. I find that there are cases where I use "have you got."

    To a friend I'd say "Have you got a moment? I need to ask you a question." I wouldn't say, "Do you have a moment?" to a friend. It sounds too formal and would sound like I'm about to deliver some bad news. :) I don't know if there are others, but I did notice myself saying this the other day after saying I never said it. :)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Is there any difference in the meaning? Or is the meaning exactly the same when you use "Have you got" or "Do you have"? Is there no difference between "I've got" and "I have" - despite difference in style, too?

    Did "got" loose the meaning of its own (get, got, got) in this idiom?

    Or is the present perfect present yet when analyzing it?

    Example:

    If somebody asks you "have you got a car?" - And you say: "Yes, I have." - does this imply that you have it actually, that it is not sold yet or damaged?
    In case of "Do you have a car?" this is clear to me. It is actually there. You have it.

    Is there a difference in the meaning depending whether you use it in a question or in an answer?

    In my (German) brain I feel a difference but a friend told me there is none between the two English forms.

    --- I searched in the forum and found this thread, and it says it is mainly just BE vs. AE. Is this the whole thing?
    I am also not sure whether this question should be a thread on its own. But the topic is nearby.
     
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I hear no difference in meaning between:
    Have you got a car?
    Do you have a car?
    I would not use the first.

    The difference in usage begins long before you get out into the Atlantic (see earlier posts).
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Thank you.
    This means that "got" lost the meaning somehow in this idiom. Otherwise the meaning would be different.

    This means that a sentence like "I've got a car, and I've lost it" is wrong, because I cannot have it and have lost it at the same time.
     
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ...
    This means that a sentence like "I've got a car, and I've lost it" is wrong, because I cannot have it and have lost it at the same time.
    But you can.
    I have a silver pen.
    I've got a silver pen.
    I have no idea where it is just now. I may have left it at Bill's house.
    Neither of those sentences has to mean that the silver pen is in my possession as I speak.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    Thank you.
    This means that "got" lost the meaning somehow in this idiom. Otherwise the meaning would be different.

    This means that a sentence like "I've got a car, and I've lost it" is wrong, because I cannot have it and have lost it at the same time.

    It seems to me that there is little point in saying of got in I've got a car and I've got to go (the first indicating possession and the second indicating obligation) that it has a separate meaning from the verbal idiom have got/'ve got.

    An argument can be made, however, that the word got in the verbal idiom is what carries the sense of possession or obligation. The evidence which would be used to argue this would be that in some nonstandard dialects the verb got is used to mean have. This use of got is thought be a shortening of I've got.

    To compare sentences with the same meaning:

    Standard: I have a car.
    Standard: I've got a car.
    Nonstandard: I got a car./I gotta car.

    Standard: I have to go.
    Standard: I've got to go.
    Nonstandard: I gotta go.
     

    Imber Ranae

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Thank you.
    This means that "got" lost the meaning somehow in this idiom. Otherwise the meaning would be different.

    This means that a sentence like "I've got a car, and I've lost it" is wrong, because I cannot have it and have lost it at the same time.

    "I've got a car, and I've lost it" is perfectly fine if you understand "lost" to refer only to a temporary condition. It would not work, however, if you said "...and I've lost it for good," unless you were describing two different stages in a vivid narrative: "[now] I've got a car...and [now] I've lost it [for good]."
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    If I understand it correctly this is a difference to "I have a car and I lost it." This is because I cannot have it and have lost it at the same time.

    If this holds, the meaning of "I've got a car" and "I have a car" is slightly different in this case.
    If I have a car means that I have it. If I lost it I do not have it anymore.
    So the sentence "I have a car and I lost it" is contradictorily while "I've got a car and I've lost it" is not.
    Or do I misunderstand the English concept of "have"? If I have something I have it, at least potentially, mostly actually.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    You may be misunderstanding the English concept of "lost", which can be used when you still own (possess) something, but don't know where it is.

    There is another meaning of "lost": to no longer have ownership of something. That is the one that is contradictory to "I have got / I have" meaning 'to possess'. However, that is not the meaning of 'lost' being used in the above examples.
     
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