Have you recovered from your cough yet?

Jasquil

Senior Member
vietnamese
Hello everyone!
I translated it word by word from Vietnamese into English and I guessed "off sick" is a colloquial phrase for "recover the sickness" but having checked on wordreference I found I was wrong.
The matter is the word "recover" in Vietnamese is specific for serious illness, not for just a cold, a fever or a cough. Maybe we should rather ask "Is your cough over yet?" than "Have you recovered from your cough yet ?". But do you native speakers have a more natural way to ask with no need to care or mention what kind of illness the person has such as "cough" in my example?
Many thanks in advance.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Is your cough better yet?" or "are you better yet?" are standard questions in this context in BE.
     

    Jasquil

    Senior Member
    vietnamese
    Thank you Andy! Can I you please tell me about the word "mend" in this example sentence:
    That night, however, he began to mend, and in a few days he was out of danger.

    Do you ever use "mend" and does it sound casual ?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    It is perfectly OK to say that you have recovered from a cold.
    If you are "off sick" this does not mean you are recovering, although the hope and expectation usually is that you are recovering. The essence of "being off sick" is that you are "absent from your work because you are sick". Basically "off" in this context means "off work", and apart from "off sick", you can also be "off on holiday".

    The word "mend" is typically used in the phrase "he is on the mend", which means he is getting better, his sickness is disappearing.
     

    Jasquil

    Senior Member
    vietnamese
    Thank you Edinburgher. I was just not sure then because in my language we have a word that means "to end cough/hurt/headache/cut/bleeding" so we can ask like "Have you ended (your cough)?" or "Are you over?" but the "Are you over?" means "I've moved on." Now I think "recover from a cough" is what you say in daily life.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    We can ask "Are you over it?" but not without this "it". It would mean approximately "Have you overcome it?"
    A possible answer, if the recovery is not yet complete, but it has started to get better, is "I am over the worst of it." and "of it" can be omitted.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Have you gotten over your cough?

    We not ask "Have you ended your cough?" because it sounds as though getting well is just something you can decide to do. But we might ask, "Have you gotten rid of your cough?"

    There is certainly nothing wrong with "have you recovered from your cough?" but it sounds a bit formal.
     

    Jasquil

    Senior Member
    vietnamese
    Thank you very much Edinburgher and Sparky. Your responses help me a lot. "Get over" and "get rid of" are exactly what I need. I was quite unsure when I had to use "recover". Yes, it's not wrong but just formal.
     
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