having to

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boggiee

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi,

- Having to discharge all my debts, I work hard to save money.

Is the usage of 'having to' grammatically OK or must I use 'because' before that? (P.S the sentence might seem clumsy but I just want to learn if it is grammatically or not)
 
  • ESustad

    Senior Member
    English - (Minnesota)
    You can use the sentence without 'because.' 'Have to' expresses necessity or obligation or duty, and can stand alone without another verb in casual speech.

    Question: Why do you work hard to save money?
    Response: [Because] I have to [save money].
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    There's nothing wrong with using a participial phrase, and there's nothing wrong with "I have to discharge all my debts", but I feel uneasy about "Having to discharge all my debts, I work hard to save money". I think that when the participle is "having", it needs to be of the type "Having discharged..." or "Having been discharged ...".

    I wouldn't have a problem with "Needing to discharge all my debts, I work hard to save money." I'm really not quite sure about your original sentence though, and would like to hear other opinions.
     
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