(Having) watching news , I have heard something interesting

Maranello_rosso

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone!
Please, if you have some time , dont you mind to help me out? Thank all of you in advance for help!
So ... i have got a sentence: (having) watching news , i have heard something interesting.
As I understand: having watching - the perfect participle. And sometimes in an informal speech *having* can be dopped. My first question : am I right here?
My second question is : can I use after the perfect participle the present perfect tense? I want to show that something has happened recently.
 
  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The perfect participle is "watched" not "watching".

    Having watched the news, I have heard something interesting.
     

    Maranello_rosso

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The perfect participle is "watched" not "watching".

    Having watched the news, I have heard something interesting.
    Oh !!! I am sorry this is what I meant : having watchED !!!. So , can I use after the perfect participle the present perfect tense? And could you please say something else? Do people say so in a natural way?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Watching the news, I have heard something interesting implies that the "something interesting" was part of the news programme.

    Having watched the news, I have heard something interesting implies that the "something interesting" was heard after the news programme finished.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Watching the news, I have heard something interesting implies that the "something interesting" was part of the news programme.

    Having watched the news, I have heard something interesting implies that the "something interesting" was heard after the news programme finished.
    Watching the news, I heard something interesting. (I'd prefer this)
     
    Last edited:

    HolyMasquerade

    Member
    English - UK
    I don't think Present Perfect sounds natural here. Not with any form of the gerund. Past Simple works better, because the action of "watching the news" creates the context of the story. In other words, you are telling a story and we know you are in the past. It doesn't matter if that past is remote or recent.
    If you say, "(While/As I was) watching the news, I heard something interesting," hearing is situated in the same past moment as watching. Watching the news is just as much a moment in the past as, for example, "5 minutes ago" ("Five minutes ago I heard something interesting").
    If you say, "Having watched the news, I heard something interesting," you are saying that you heard something after you finished watching. But, again, I think the Present Perfect sounds awkward.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with both Chasint and HolyMasquerade:
    (a) I would prefer the simple past in both sentences.
    (b) I suspect that what Maranello is looking for is
    Watching the news, I heard something interesting.
    (
    Or ... Watching the news, I saw something interesting;).)
     

    Maranello_rosso

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I don't think Present Perfect sounds natural here. Not with any form of the gerund. Past Simple works better, because the action of "watching the news" creates the context of the story. In other words, you are telling a story and we know you are in the past. It doesn't matter if that past is remote or recent.
    If you say, "(While/As I was) watching the news, I heard something interesting," hearing is situated in the same past moment as watching. Watching the news is just as much a moment in the past as, for example, "5 minutes ago" ("Five minutes ago I heard something interesting").
    If you say, "Having watched the news, I heard something interesting," you are saying that you heard something after you finished watching. But, again, I think the Present Perfect sounds awkward.
    Thank you so much !!!!!!!!° it is clear to me as never!!!!!!!!
     

    Maranello_rosso

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I agree with both Chasint and HolyMasquerade:
    (a) I would prefer the simple past in both sentences.
    (b) I suspect that what Maranello is looking for is
    Watching the news, I heard something interesting.
    (
    Or ... Watching the news, I saw something interesting;).)
    Yes, you are right!!!! Thank you very much!!!!
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Watching the news, I heard something interesting. (I'd prefer this)
    This is another instance of a construction that is perfectly correct, but although it answers your question, I cannot imagine any native speaker using such a sentence.

    As the old adage says, "Be careful what you ask for."

    Here in AE Land, in my experience, we'd probably say something simpler, like "I saw something interesting on the news."
     

    Maranello_rosso

    Senior Member
    Russian
    This is another instance of a construction that is perfectly correct, but although it answers your question, I cannot imagine any native speaker using such a convoluted sentence.

    As the old adage says, "Be careful what you ask for."

    Here in AE Land, in my experience, we'd probably say something like "I saw something interesting on the news."
    So, does it mean that you use present or perfect participles in a speech really seldom?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    No. It's more a matter of using them idiomatically, even if it gets a bit wordy.

    You could say "I was watching the news last night and saw something interesting."
     

    Maranello_rosso

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Use of participle constructions to replace finite clauses occurs relatively seldom in spoken English.
    Could you please tell something more? it would be better to say that mostly you use the newxt word order :subject - predicate- object, subject - predicate ..and so on. I mean it is easier to say using S-P structure sentence rather using participles. Do I get to the point here?
     
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