Haze, fog or mist?

meagain9969

Member
Mexico. Spanish
Hi! Could anybody give a hand with this?

I don't really know the difference among these terms: Haze, mist and fog. (Should I use a comma after mist?)

As far as I know haze goes for hot weather and it is not as thick as fog. Am I right?

By the way, would it be ok if I write "i" in small case?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Ratona

    Senior Member
    UK - Eng
    Hi!

    Haze is used for hot weather, but you could also say the haze around the moon. So, generally speaking it is when you can see the distortion created by the presence of (water) particles. Or a mirage could come from a haze in the distance.

    Mist is a thin cover of 'white', which often appears in the morning or afternoon.

    Fog is thicker and can make it so you can't see a thing!

    If you´re wanting to grammatically correct you should not write I in lower case.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Water droplets that cause a moderate reduction in visibility are called mist. Those causing a serious visibility problem are called fog. Mists and fogs often form over seas, rivers, and lakes. Particles of dust, smoke or salt that affect the clarity of the air are collectively known as haze.
    Source
     

    bartonig

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Another word that might interest you is smog. Any Londoner over 50 years has experienced a smog. It's a very thick fog caused by pollution. You, literally, cannot see beyond a yard or two. In the case of London it was caused by the domestic and industrial burning of coal and lasted a few days. After a law banning the burning of coal the smogs disappeared.
     

    meagain9969

    Member
    Mexico. Spanish
    Here in Mexico we have also experienced the effects of smog. However, I think we have not yet reached those levels you mentioned bartonig.

    Thanks a lot.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hi, everyone!
    And which word would be suitable when we speak about mountains?
    I have the following sentence:
    The majestic mountains were seen far away cloaked in the blue haze.
    (It is from the Sufi parables that I am translating now. http://sufi-parables.swami-center.org/)

    Is it right to use "haze" in this case?
    Yes, it would, as would be using 'fog' or 'mist', although the former is said to be exceptionally thick and the latter typical of mountains, which renders 'mist' the best option to be used with mountaints. :) But really, if you're not a metereologist, you could well use either.
     
    Last edited:

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Hi, everyone!
    And which word would be suitable when we speak about mountains?
    I have the following sentence:
    The majestic mountains were seen far away cloaked in the blue haze.
    (It is from the Sufi parables that I am translating now. http://sufi-parables.swami-center.org/)

    Is it right to use "haze" in this case?
    Yes, haze is used when referring to mountains. You see blue haze when you are looking at them from a distance.
     
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