'He’d been given the eye and he’d cocked a deaf ’un but now he was listening.' (UK)

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mO_ok

Senior Member
Lithuanian
Hi,
well, where do I begin... I can give you a sentence before this one (it's from Angela Marsons 'Lost Girls'). It's about a lad entering a bar:

'He parked in the high street and entered a bar he’d been in a
few weeks ago with a couple of mates. He’d been given the eye
and he’d cocked a deaf ’un but now he was listening.'

It's possible that it is a gay bar we are dealing with here, if that's of any help.
I would like to clarify what 'giving the eye' means here as well as 'cocked a deaf'un'. I have no idea about the meaning of the latter.
 
  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    "He’d been given the eye" = He had been looked over and (probably) seen to be worth further acquaintance.
    "Cocked a deaf'un" I find a bit more obscure. "To cock one's ear" means "to tilt one's head (as dogs do) to get a better aural perspective, but here the ear is "deaf." --"He paid no attention." But now he has begun to listen.
     

    mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    Yes, the 'deaf'un' baffles me the most. Is it abbreviation in the middle of some kind or a separate word?
     

    mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    I want to be precise (I'm sure cyberpedant would understand it *_^) and find out what does the apostrophe stand for. Any suggestions?
     
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