He can go jogging and <can> play the drums.

rino delbello

Senior Member
italian
Hi All

I want to talk about two abilities someone has , can I answer ' Yes, he can go jogging and play the drums ' or should I say ' Yes, he can go jogging and can play drums '. Grammatically speaking, which one is the most correct ?

I would use the 2nd.
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think we need much more context to advise on this. Also, I found your sentences confusing because without context “he can go jogging” normally refers to factors such such as permission, or availability of suitable environments for jogging, not the absence of a physical or mental disability that prevents jogging. Which did you mean?
     
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    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    OK. Here is the context : question and answer in written form. I need to provide a correct answer by adding another ability ( playing the drums ) .This is the structure :

    Question : Can he go jogging ?
    Answer to be provided : Yes, he can and can play the drums (in my opinion)

    He already have both abilities. A person ask another if he has these skills and the former provide an answer.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    You need to repeat the subject pronoun. It is a poor question for the reasons explained above but if that's all you have to do with it ... . You might like to consider that 'going jogging' isn't usually considered a skill.
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    OK, but not all people can go fishing....then ? se16teddy, forget jogging, sorry I have made a mistake. Let's move on to ' go fishing '.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you are asking if the person has fishing skills, or is a good angler, you'd have to ask something like 'Is he (any) good at fishing?' or 'Is he a good/expert angler?'
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    heypresto , yes , I mean that he is goog at fishing but I need to replace this good at fishing with ' can ' . Se16teddy not all people know how to fish! Obviously there is somewhere to go fishing. Yes, hermione, it is an exercise to complete with can for both abilities.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The problem is that "Can he go fishing?" doesn't mean "Does he know how to fish?"

    "Can he go fishing?" means "Is there an opportunity for him to go fishing?" or "Does he have permission to go fishing?"
     
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    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Yes, he can fish and play the drums is about abilities: he knows how to fish and play the drums. He can go fishing/jogging means he's allowed to go fishing/jogging, he has been given permission to go fishing/jogging and therefore has nothing to do with ability, as the others have said.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Can is used for ability, so ' he can go fishing ' may also refer to ability
    In "can go Xing", the "can" applies to the "go" - Can he go (leave the house or wherever he is) in order to do X? It's about the ability to go, not the ability to fish.
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    OK, so Myridom to refer to ability should I say ' Can he fish ' ? But if I refer to kayak, shouldn't I say ' Can he go kayaking ? '. Does the latter refer to ability or not ?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Right. Can he fish? Can he jog? Those are abilities. You don't add "go" for abilities.

    If the action does not have a verb, use "do". Can he do yoga?

    But "jog" and "fish" are verbs.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I hesitate to say it yet again but 'can' is not the right verb because it is used to give permission. Are you devising this exercise?
    Try 'Does he know how to ... ?'
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    OK, so Myridom to refer to ability should I say ' Can he fish ' ? But if I refer to kayak, shouldn't I say ' Can he go kayaking ? '. Does the latter refer to ability or not ?
    Again, switching the word from jogging to fishing to kayaking doesn't change the grammar of the sentence. "can go" still means "can he leave". He has nothing better to do, he has access to a lake and a kayak so he can go to the lake, get in the kayak, and drown. Yes, he can go kayaking.
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    OK, but I have checked ' go kayaking ' in Wordreference's dictionary and in Italian it is translated as ' andare in kayak ' . ' Andare in kayak ' is not an ability that everyone can do. Therefore, my doubt remains....
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    London calling in natural English to refer to ability, do you say ' I do kayaking ' or ' I go kayaking ' ?

    Please take a look at this post 'do' or 'go' with certain sports and activities. Moreover, if you check a dictionary at the entry ' kayaking ' , you mostly see ' go kayaking ', not ' do kayaking '. This may be a reasong for choosing go kayaking instead of do kayaking. Therefore, if I say ' Can he go kayaking ' ? It may refer to ability. This is why my doubt remains. Please all of you in this discussion be aware of the entry ' go kayaking ' in most dictionaries and its ability-related function.
     
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    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hermione, by thinking about this discussion, I have understood that you all English people use ' do ' and not ' go ' to refer to ability. Therefore my doubts have been cleared now, Thank you all very much :). Please Hermione take a look at my reference to dictionaries and think about it.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    OK, but I have checked ' go kayaking ' in Wordreference's dictionary and in Italian it is translated as ' andare in kayak ' . ' Andare in kayak ' is not an ability that everyone can do. Therefore, my doubt remains....
    Google Translate also tells me that "andare" also means "go". Not everyone can go kayaking because it is expensive or far away. That is different from being able to kayak - being able to use the oars and such.
    There are many people who can kayak (they know how, they have the physical skills) who cannot go kayaking because they have to work, they don't have a kayak, ...
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Please take a look at this post 'do' or 'go' with certain sports and activities. Moreover, if you check a dictionary at the entry ' kayaking ' , you mostly see ' go kayaking ', not ' do kayaking '. This may be a reasong for choosing go kayaking instead of do kayaking. Therefore, if I say ' Can he go kayaking ' ? It may refer to ability. This is why my doubt remains. Please all of you in this discussion be aware of the entry ' go kayaking ' in most dictionaries and its ability-related function.
    The issue is whether or not there is a verb for the activity. "To kayak" is a verb. "To karate" is not. You don't need "do" with "kayaking" and, as we've said "go kayaking" is not a substituted for "do kayaking" - it has a very different meaning.
    He kayaks on Saturdays. :tick:
    He karates on Saturdays. :cross:
    He does karate on Saturdays. :tick:
    Can he kayak? Can he fish? Can he jog? :tick:
    Can he karate? :cross:
    Can he do karate? :tick:
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    OK, I understand you. Therefore dictionaries have no longer values if you are against the entry of kayaking in the dictionary. Is that correct ? Ok, but if you take a look at the entry ' kayaking ', not ' to kayak ', you will mainly see ' go kayaking '. Why is ' do kayaking ' not mentioned as the entry kayaking refers to the action od doing kayaking ?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't need to be told how to use my own language. The problem is that you need to ask the right questions of us. If we are talking about whether to use 'go' or 'do', other questions need to be devised not using 'can'. Your use of 'can' has completely confused the issue.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Go + verb- ing' is used for activities which involve moving from one place to another to do them.
    If my hobby is knitting I do not ever 'go knitting' because there is no movement involved.
    ''I'm not going sailing this weekend, I'm doing my homework/ballet practice instead''.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Therefore dictionaries have no longer values if you are against the entry of kayaking in the dictionary. Is that correct ?
    This sentence makes no sense so I can't tell if you are thinking of something correct.
    Ok, but if you take a look at the entry ' kayaking ', not ' to kayak ', you will mainly see ' go kayaking '. Why is ' do kayaking ' not mentioned as the entry kayaking refers to the action od doing kayaking ?
    As I already mentioned, the way to say "do kayaking" is just "kayak" so there's no entry for "do kayaking."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I want to talk about two abilities someone has , can I answer ' Yes, he can go jogging and play the drums ' or should I say ' Yes, he can go jogging and can play drums '.
    Neither expresses what you want to say. Some context is needed.

    A: "What are you good at? What can you do best?"
    B: "I can jog for miles and I can play the drums."
    A: [to C] "What about you? What can you do?"
    C: "I can fish and I can kayak."
    A: [to D] "What about you? What can you do?"
    D: "I'm a 7th Dan karate expert and can kill a man with my little finger."
     
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