he comes whenever he needs money. This is not on

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mamamoth

New Member
portuguese
he never comes to see me except when he's stuck for money. This is not on. Now, this is not on means , this is not fair? is that correct?

Thank you for your help
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Richard. "This is not on" doesn't make much sense to me in the context you provided. Your guess about what the phrase means seems reasonable.

    Other members may be able to give you better answers if you can explain the context a little. Did you find the sentences in a letter that somebody wrote to you? Does that person speak English fluently?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Welcome to the forum, Mamamoth. :)
    He never comes to see me except when he's stuck for money. This is not on.
    Now, "this is not on" means this is not fair?
    No, I'm sorry, it doesn't mean that. Please tell us the source of the two sentences you've quoted.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    This post from 2012 in another forum on this site started with a British speaker giving this phrase with the same meaning (unacceptable):

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2410432

    Greetings,

    “This is not on!” is a way of saying that something is totally unacceptable. A teacher might say it when he sees an older pupil bullying a younger pupil, for example.
    It sounds familiar to me, maybe from British television shows.
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, it's something I use all the time for something that's unacceptable or unfair, usually referring to someone's behaviour.

    "Your boss wants you to work late again? That's just not on!"
     

    mamamoth

    New Member
    portuguese
    Thank you very much for your reply dear Owlman5,

    I have an elderly Irish friend and he had to move back to Ireland still he lived down in Brazil, where I am for 8 years and he would often say that whenever he was angry with somebody who would take advantage of him. I mean, he's a very good man and we still keep in touch on the phone, not as often as we did back at the time he lived down here where I am though. Anyway, whenever he got angry about anything annoying that anybody did to him he would say like "he parks his car just outside my gate, I'm good to him and he never say thanks and never offered any help at all, this is not on". Also when he wanted to say that somebody was having a fierce argument he would say like: "that oul gabster (to refer to an elderly woman who lived near him who used to spread a lot of gossip), was GIVING OUT TO her neighbour because he let his dog pee outside her gate". Also, I've never heard anybody use the verb 'GIVE OUT TO SOMEBODY' meaning (having a fierce argument/yelling/calling names). Now, have you ever hear any of both (give out to somebody) and (this is not on)?

    PS: that's very kind of you to reply to me and much appreciated

    wishing you all the very best,

    mamamoth xoxo
     

    mamamoth

    New Member
    portuguese
    Thank you very much Dear Susan Y.

    I guess this is just what I've been looking for.

    Yes, it's something I use all the time for something that's unacceptable or unfair, usually referring to someone's behaviour.

    Your lovely quote : "Your boss wants you to work late again? That's just not on!"

    thank you very much

    Bestest wishes

    mamamoth x
     

    mamamoth

    New Member
    portuguese
    Also I want to thank all the members on this page for your warm welcome and help.

    Bless you all,

    mamamoth xxx
     

    mamamoth

    New Member
    portuguese
    Great one example this one too, Dear Truffula.

    I know now how I could use it in a sentence and avoid mistakes.

    Thank you very much,

    Bless you Truffula xoxo
     

    mamamoth

    New Member
    portuguese
    Thank you very much for your reply dear Owlman5,

    (I made a mistake because this has been my first time on this forum page and wrote to somebody else by mistake all that you're going to read just below, I meant to reply to you before and I might have got the wrong person, anyway You have it all that I wrote before just below)

    I have an elderly Irish friend and he had to move back to Ireland still he lived down in Brazil, where I am for 8 years and he would often say that whenever he was angry with somebody who would take advantage of him. I mean, he's a very good man and we still keep in touch on the phone, not as often as we did back at the time he lived down here where I am though. Anyway, whenever he got angry about anything annoying that anybody did to him he would say like "he parks his car just outside my gate, I'm good to him and he never say thanks and never offered any help at all, this is not on". Also when he wanted to say that somebody was having a fierce argument he would say like: "that oul gabster (to refer to an elderly woman who lived near him who used to spread a lot of gossip), was GIVING OUT TO her neighbour because he let his dog pee outside her gate". Also, I've never heard anybody use the verb 'GIVE OUT TO SOMEBODY' meaning (having a fierce argument/yelling/calling names). Now, have you ever hear any of both (give out to somebody) and (this is not on)?

    PS: that's very kind of you to reply to me and much appreciated

    wishing you all the very best,

    mamamoth xoxo
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've never heard that. BE speakers: Is it actually used that way?
    Yes, it's very commonly used.

    Example
    Well, that's not on, Tom. If he's 16 he's not under 16.
    Cambridge English for Schools 4 Student's, Book 4 By Andrew Littlejohn, Diana Hicks
    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...dir_esc=y#v=onepage&q="that's not on"&f=false

    Context: The above characters are discussing whether or not someone is eligible for an under-16 volleyball team now that he has just passed his 16th birthday.
     
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