He committed the crime on no account.

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esther927

Member
Korean
Hi guys,

I want to ask about this sentence. Isn't this the same meaning as "He committed the crime for no reason."? This is quoted as an example to explain the phrase "on no account", but the translation in our language calls the exact opposite meaning of what I think. It says this sentence means "He definitely did not commit the crime". Am I understanding this sentence wrong?
 
  • reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    'He committed the crime on no account' does not mean "He committed the crime for no reason."

    In fact, the first sentence above "He committed the crime on no account" actually does not mean anything....it is incorrect. The reason it's wrong is because the syntax is wrong which means word/phrase is in the wrong position. To correct this, you have to write:

    On no account did he commit the crime. which means: Under no circumstances did he commit the crime.

    but this still is not the same as your sentence: He committed the crime for no reason.

    In your sentence, the man definitely committed the crime. In the other sentence, he definitely did not commit the crime.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    He definitely did not commit the crime.

    My use of the phrase in question would be as in:
    On no account should one ever commit a crime. (Under no circumstances...)
     

    esther927

    Member
    Korean
    'He committed the crime on no account' does not mean "He committed the crime for no reason."

    In fact, the first sentence above "He committed the crime on no account" actually does not mean anything....it is incorrect. The reason it's wrong is because the syntax is wrong which means word/phrase is in the wrong position. To correct this, you have to write:

    On no account did he commit the crime. which means: Under no circumstances did he commit the crime.

    but this still is not the same as your sentence: He committed the crime for no reason.

    In your sentence, the man definitely committed the crime. In the other sentence, he definitely did not commit the crime.
    Oh, this definitely helped my understanding. Thank you very much! I did guess the original sentence was weird, but couldn't quite find the point.

    He definitely did not commit the crime.

    My use of the phrase in question would be as in:
    On no account should one ever commit a crime. (Under no circumstances...)
    Thank you very much!
     
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