He considers Tom Tim" or "He considers Football Cricket

tufguy

Senior Member
hindi
Can we say "He considers Tom Tim" or "He considers Football Cricket"? Or do we need to say "He considers Tom as Tim" or "He considers Football as Cricket"?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'Consider as' has a different meaning; it means considering in one respect, considering one aspect of something. The other meaning of 'consider' can be followed directly by a noun phrase or an adjective phrase that describes the object, which your examples don't:

    He considers Tom an idiot.
    He considers football a waste of time.
    He considers football interesting.

    These can also have 'to be' between them, with the same meaning:

    He considers Tom to be an idiot.
    He considers football to be interesting.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Can we say "He considers Tom Tim" or "He considers Football Cricket"? Or do we need to say "He considers Tom as Tim" or "He considers Football as Cricket"?
    I think what you want to say is "He (often) mistakes Tom for Tim" and "He confuses football with cricket".

    "Consider" isn't the right word there, as #3 says.
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    He considers Tom to be Tim because they are twins.

    He considers Football to be Cricket because he doesn't know anything about sports.

    Are these still incorrect?

    We can't write them like this as well "He considers Tom as Tim because they are twins" or "He considers Football as Cricket because he doesn't know anything about sports". Am I correct?
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    He considers Tom to be Tim because they are twins.

    He considers Football to be Cricket because he doesn't know anything about sports.

    Are these still incorrect?
    They are incorrect because they mean that in each case the person is mistaking one thing for another.
    The word 'considers' rules out that idea: it implies that the person knows what each person or thing is.

    You can say 'He mistakes Tom for Tim' or 'He confuses Tom with Tim' (when speaking about the person's habitual practice).
    You can also say 'He thought Tom was Tim' or 'He thought football was cricket' (when speaking about a particular occasion).
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    They are incorrect because they mean that in each case the person is mistaking one thing for another.
    The word 'considers' rules out that idea: it implies that the person knows what each person or thing is.

    You can say 'He mistakes Tom for Tim' or 'He confuses Tom with Tim' (when speaking about the person's habitual practice).
    You can also say 'He thought Tom was Tim' or 'He thought football was cricket' (when speaking about a particular occasion).

    But those were not grammatically incorrect. Am I correct?

    Can we say "He considers Tim his best friend" or He considers Tim to be his best friend" or "He considers Tim as his best friend"?

    Could you please tell me when do we need to use "As" after consider?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Can we say "He considers Tim his best friend" or He considers Tim to be his best friend" or "He considers Tim as his best friend"?
    I suggest that you open a new thread for this use of 'consider'. It's different from the OP which uses 'consider' in an unacceptable way.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    But those were not grammatically incorrect. Am I correct?
    They were misusing the word 'consider'. That might be called a semantic error or I suppose a syntactical (i.e. grammatical) error.
    At any rate, it is a definite error and the sentences are incorrect.

    (a) 'He considers Tim his best friend':tick:
    (b) 'He considers Tim to be his best friend':tick:
    (c) 'He considers Tim as his best friend': not wrong, but less good than (a).

    Cross-posted.
     
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