He didn’t take the love-making altogether personally

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words(
the last paragraph but 18 ) from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover by Lawrence (the University of Adelaide,here):
"Connie felt he must have forgotten the morning. He had not forgotten. But he knew where he was . . . in the same old place outside, where the born outsiders are.
He didn’t take the love-making altogether personally. "

What does He didn’t take the love-making altogether personally mean please? It's so hard to understand it. I guess it's a structure: take(meaning paying attention to) something altogether (modifying personally) personally, Is that right?

Could native English speakers tell me the meaning of "he didn't take the love-making altogether personally"?

Thank you in advance
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Could native English speakers tell me the meaning of "he didn't take the love-making altogether personally"?
    This should mean "He didn't become sentimental or emotional about the love-making."
     
    It says a bit later,

    But occasional love, as a comfort and soothing, was also a good thing, and he was not ungrateful.

    It means he didn't let it affect him to the core.

    X takes something personally
    , means this: I go to the concert and stand in line, but just when I get to the ticket office, someone there says, "We're closed.
    you may not get a ticket or go in." To take this personally would be to get angry and think or say, "But you shouldn't be doing this to me. I don't deserve it. I waited in line. I'm hurt and angry and insist you sell me a ticket."

    Later I tell my friends, and they say, "You shouldn't take it so personally; they simply ran out of tickets."
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you two so much. I seem to have understood something about it. Now I know take something personally is a set phrase. And minurtes ago, I found an explanation from a dictionary:to get upset by the things other people say or do, because you think that their remarks or behaviour are directed at you in particular.

    But another question occurs to me:
    it's normal that Michaelis did not get upset or angry after making love, because love is usually comfortable and soothing, as bennymix said. So the orginal sentence "he didn't take the love-making altogether personally" is redudant for readers.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    So the orginal sentence"he didn't take the love-making altogether personally" is redudant for readers.
    It isn't redundant to me. It means that he did not become too emotional or sentimental just because he had sex with this partner. The sex wasn't that big a deal to him.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    It isn't redundant to me. It means that he did not become too emotional or sentimental just because he had sex with this partner. The sex wasn't that big a deal to him.

    Thank you owlman5. But take something personally means upset or angry, not emotional or sentimental, accordting to the entry of a dictionary.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I think Lawrence is using the word with a slightly different meaning. I think it's closer to "emotional" or "sentimental" here. "Upset" and "angry" don't make any sense.
     
    Long,
    Anger is just one possibility. In my example, I mentioned 'hurt'; that works just as well--feeling that oneself is the target of something unpleasant. Lawrence is using it even more widely, as Owl says, relating to personal involvement.

    Here is an example. A person I hardly know is approaching. They say, "Hello, how are you." I respond. Do I think. "Oh, that was a pleasant thing I've encountered"? Or do I think, "This person really takes an interest in me and likes me. How nice!" The latter is taking or construing something 'personally.'




    Thank you owlman5. But take something personally means upset or angry, not emotional or sentimental, accordting to the entry of a dictionary.
     
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