He does not know English, not to mention German or French.

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Ocham

Senior Member
Japanese
Can I replace the underlined part with "let alone"?

He does not know English, not to mention German or French.

If yes, which do you use more often?
 
  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    I think let alone is actually better here. Though it is sometimes used with negative sentences (as in your example, "He does not know..."), not to mention really works better with positives, in my opinion, as in this example from Merriam-Webster online: "a proposal that's risky and expensive, not to mention unethical."
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I think let alone is actually better here. Though it is sometimes used with negative sentences (as in your example, "He does not know..."), not to mention really works better with positives, in my opinion, as in this example from Merriam-Webster online: "a proposal that's risky and expensive, not to mention unethical."
    :thumbsup:

    My feeling as well, not to mention the way I would use it. :)
     

    Kahaani

    Senior Member
    Yes you can replace them interchangeably in most cases, although let alone does indeed have a negative tone.

    I personally use let alone more often (maybe I'm a negative person.)
     
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