he dreaded her cool, upper-class impudence of having her own way

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(para. 41) by Lawrence(the University of Adelaide,here):
He wished above all things she would go away, and leave him to his own privacy. He dreaded her will, her female will, and her modern female insistency. And above all he dreaded her cool, upper-class impudence of having her own way. For after all he was only a hired man.

Well, maybe this question is a little challenging if you are not familiar with the novel.
As far as I know, Connie had never been cool, rude to other people, including people of lower-class. Why did Mellors thought that way please?

Thank you in advance
 
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  • joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Well, he doesn't say "rude." That's your word. He says "cool" which can refer to an attitude of reserve or aloofness or lack of emotion. The "upper-class impudence of having her own way" is his way of saying that she is accustomed to having her own way and expects it.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Oh. Thank you. Maybe Connie was indeed cool, aloof and lacked emotion before, which I didn't feel before, even though Lawrence created her as a positive character.
    Forgot to tell you, the "rude" explanation is from Cambridge dictionary:
    impudent
    adjective
    rude and not respectful, especially towards someone who is older or in a more important position:
    an impudent remark/child
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Lawrence is writing about how Mellors felt about Connie's insistence. She is using her power as his employer's wife to get her own way. Impudent can certainly mean rude and is very often used for children. Why would the author put this word in Mellors' thoughts about her behaviour?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's true that class prejudice can work both ways.
    In addition to the class aspect, her upper-class impudence, I wouldn't blame Mellors for finding her childishly impudent too.
     
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