He gave me a most tremendous dip and roll

Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
He gave me a most tremendous dip and roll, so that the church
jumped over its own weather-cock.
*The Project Gutenberg Etext of Great Expectations, by Dickens*

What does exactly dip and roll mean please?
Could its origin have something to do with food preparation?

Thank you,
Tom
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Can you give us a little more context, please? If "the church jumped over its own weather-cock", I would assume the author was tumbling in some way and saw the weather-cock on the top of the church spire look as if it was below the church.

    Please give us a sentence or two before this one.
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Could its origin have something to do with food preparation?

    No! It means that the speaker had been really quite taken aback, I imagine. I suppose it could also mean that he had been knocked over quite literally by the greeting he had received. I can't remember too much of the original, and I can't find my copy of the book, but I would suggest one of my assumptions fits the words.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    It does not mean the speaker has been taken aback. It is being used quite literally - Pip has already been held upside down by the escaped convict, who has now been making him bend backwards. Pip has indicated that leaning backwards is making him sick, and asks to be put upright. The convict now turns Pip over to put him upright on the tombstone. The motion is the "dip and roll" described, and as Pip has his eyes open, it looks as if the church is turning upside down, while actually it is Pip who is turning.

    "wittles", by the way, is the convict's lower-class pronunciation of the word "victuals", which is in fact pronounced as if it were written "vittles". Dickens often shows that a speaker is lower-class by having him pronounce his "v's" as "w's".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Here's the context.

    Pip has already been turned upside-down once; now he's on top of a tombstone with Magwitch tilting him at a dangerous angle. "Dip and roll" appears to mean that Magwitch turns him over in a sort of somersault.

    It's nothing to do with food preparation, Tom:)

    EDIT: sorry GWB, I hadn't seen yours when I was typing this!
     

    Scherle

    Senior Member
    Filipino, and English
    He gave me a most tremendous dip and roll, so that the church
    jumped over its own weather-cock.
    *The Project Gutenberg Etext of Great Expectations, by Dickens*

    What does exactly dip and roll mean please?
    Could its origin have something to do with food preparation?

    Thank you,
    Tom
    It doesn't do anything with food. I believe dip and roll means forward or backward/upside-down.:D
     
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