'He goes to his uncle's house' or '... to uncle's house'

lam3r4370

Member
Bulgarian
Which of these is correct?
'He goes to his uncle's house'
or
'He goes to uncle's house'
 
Last edited:
  • Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi.
    I'm a non-native English speaker, whose comment might be wrong. (And often.)

    I think uncle's house is correct, because when I searched both phrase at Google, almost all web sites adopted "uncle's house".

    Edit)Unfortunately I didn't notice the moderator's message, before I posted.

    I know I have to wait until the original poster claims his/her opinion first. It's the rule.

    So forget about this post.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Using Google is one way to resolve these questions ;)
    Lots of native writers get muddled about apostrophes, so you might find lots of ERRORS when you Google!

    There is a more traditional way too, to do with the general purposes of apostrophes. In this case the ' is showing that the house belongs to the uncle.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Which of these is correct?
    'He goes to his uncle's house'
    or
    'He goes to uncle's house'
    Actually, I think the first one is right. The the test here is not about the apostrophe, they both have that the same, the difference is about the word HIS.

    Two would sound very odd in most situations. The first one is more natural to me, but I am not sure there is a realy grammatical reason for it, more the conventions of how we refer to people and their relatinships.
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Oh,my title isn't correct.I wanted to ask "He goes to his uncle's house or ""... to uncle's house"

    Hi.
    I might be wrong as always, but I think "He goes to his uncle's house" is better.
    Because, the listener cannot decide;
    He goes to my uncle's house or
    He goes to her uncle's house or
    He goes to your uncle's house

    "He goes to his/my mom's/sister's house" is the same thing.

    If you abbreviate his/my/her, an or the (an article) should be needed, grammatically, but
    "He goes to an uncle's house." seems very vague to me.
    "He goes to one of his uncles' house".
    "He goes to one of my uncles' house" might be better.
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi.
    I searched Google, which might be looking for mere-a-lot-of-mistakes, and found;
    "He goes to his uncle's house" ・・・・・646 web sites
    "He goes to uncle's house"  ・・・・・6 web sites, including non-native's
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Which of these is correct?
    'He goes to his uncle's house'
    or
    'He goes to uncle's house'
    I would say that it depends on the sense in which the word uncle is used.

    Is 'Uncle' the name by which the writer and 'he' address and speak of a particular person? For example, when he gets to his uncle's house, might he say "Uncle, will you take me to the park today?" If so, Uncle is a name and does not need an appendage like an article (a, the) or a pronon like 'his'. However, in this case you would spell Uncle with a capital letter because it is a name:
    He goes to Uncle's house.

    Alternatively, is uncle a 'common noun', one that could be used of all the uncles in the world? if so, it generally needs an article (a, the) or a pronon like 'his', and is spelt witha lower case letter.
    He goes to his uncle's house.
     
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