He had a boner.

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Good morning ladies & gentlemen, I have been always fascinating by the French verb "bander" becasue just a simple verb can express what e.g. English expresses with a verb+noun combination, what's more some languages have quite a common noun for it (hard-on, boner, Ständer, stoyak, etc) we do not have or do not use at all. How would you say "he had a boner" in different languages. I am mostly interested in less common languages & colloquial, vulgar, slang langauge. Thank you in advance and have a productive day. Enco. PS: Please, write the literal translation, too

Hungarian: Felállt neki. [feláll - to sand up, felállt - it stood up, neki - to him]
 
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  • Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Oh, of course I am interested in slang, colloquial, vulgar, dirty language only. :D
    Is it not possible to say: just something like "he got it hard" without pinto in Portuguese?
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Some people have written Ele ficou duro on the internet with that meaning. It's a usage I'm not familiar with, but I don't see why it couldn't be used if the context is clear enough.
     
    Greek:

    :warning: «Καύλα» [ˈkav.la] (fem.) --> hard-on, sexual desire < Classical masc. noun «καυλός» kau̯lós or neut. diminutive «καυλίον» kau̯líŏn --> shaft, stalk, quill of a feather, (metaph.) erected penis (PIE *kau̯-l- shaft cf Lat. caulis, shaft, Lith. kaulas, bone, Ltv. kaūls, shaft).
    He has a boner:
    -«Έχει καύλες» [ˈe.çi ˈkav.les] --> He has boners (the noun is in pl. for emphasis).
    Also, we could turn the noun into a participle (in this case, mediopassive):
    -«Είναι καυλωμένος» [ˈine kav.lɔˈme.nɔs] --> He is horny.

    Less vulgar:
    «Έχει σηκωμάρες» [ˈe.çi si.kɔˈma.ɾes] --> He has rise-ups (again the noun is in pl. for emphasis).
    «Σηκωμάρα» [si.kɔˈma.ɾa] (fem.) --> penile erection, rise-up < v. «σηκώνω» [siˈkɔ.nɔ] --> to lift something up < Classical denominative v. «σηκόω/σηκῶ» sēkóō (uncontracted)/sēkô (contracted) --> to weigh against, balance, equalise, compensate < Classical masc. noun «σηκός» sēkós --> enclosure, fence, pen, stable, enclosed sacred space (with obscure etymology) + productive suffix for feminine nouns of discomfort, of unpleasant situation, or simply, declaring a state, «-μάρα» [-ˈma.ɾa] < augmentative of neuter suffix «-μα» [-ma] added to verbal stems to form neuter nouns denoting the result of an action, a particular instance of an action, or the object of an action (PIE *-mn̥ cf Lat. suffix -mentum).
     
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    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I think Romance languages prefer "to have it hard", Slavic languages might prefer "to stand up" but let's wait if anybody can surprise us.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan also has one verb for that: trempar.

    It means 'to temper, to harden' when used for metals, but 'to have a boner' in vulgar speech.

    Although it's used as a single verb, many speakers use a construction with "go + participle": anar trempat.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Very interesting Penyafort there is a verb in Catalan just like IN French, so now I Know about two languages.
    So he had a boner would be: Anava trempat. :confused:
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    He's got a hard-on might be more frequent than he's got a boner. He's got a stiffy is a less vulgar way to say it. Also, he's pitching a tent. He got a woody. Or really there is nothing wrong with he got an erection. He got hard. He's aroused.
     
    Catalan also has one verb for that: trempar.

    It means 'to temper, to harden' when used for metals, but 'to have a boner' in vulgar speech.

    Although it's used as a single verb, many speakers use a construction with "go + participle": anar trempat.
    Greek too has a verb:
    :warning: «Καυλώνω» [kavˈlɔ.nɔ] --> to have an erection, be sexually aroused < :warning: neut. noun «καυλί» [kavˈli] --> erected penis < Classical neut. diminutive «καυλίον» kau̯líŏn (see my previous post for further info).
    Hence we could say «καύλωσε» [ˈkav.lɔ.se] (3rd p. sing. simple past) --> he had (a) boner, but I think in every-day language we prefer the periphrasis «είχε καύλες» [ˈi.çe ˈkav.les] --> he had boners (again the noun is in pl. for emphasis).
     

    alfaalfa

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao,
    not Italian, but my dialect (Foggia - Apulia) too has a verb: Intostare (to became hard; tosto = hard). Only masculine and pretty rude.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Good morning Alfafalfa, thank your very much for the interesting comment I appreciate it very much since it is Italian and what's more a dialect. But how would you say: He had a hard-on? Does the verb intostare apply to the penis or to the man (like in French)? Thanks
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Is that verb unique for Catalan, do you know about something similar in Spanish?
    Well, I know the verb empalmarse, and the construction ir empalmado.

    I've heard people from Latin America use pararse, but I don't know if ir parado is possible, and I can't remember which variety uses this.
     

    Mister Draken

    Senior Member
    Castellano (Argentina)
    Well, I know the verb empalmarse, and the construction ir empalmado.

    I've heard people from Latin America use pararse, but I don't know if ir parado is possible, and I can't remember which variety uses this.
    No, "ir parado" is not possible. It Is used in Argentina: "se me para la pija" (penis). In Cuba as well: "se me para la pinga". Or "tengo la pija/pinga parada".
     

    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    German:
    This is correct. There is also "er hatte einen Steifen / eine Latte" (literally: "a stiff one", "a lath").

    In the case of "Latte", particular attention must be paid to the gender of the noun (fem. (!)). The masculine noun "der Latte" means caffè latte. There's plenty of room for puns. :D
     

    bandini

    Senior Member
    inglés gabacho aunque vivo en Mexico
    German:

    This is correct. There is also "er hatte einen Steifen / eine Latte" (literally: "a stiff one", "a lath").

    In the case of "Latte", particular attention must be paid to the gender of the noun (fem. (!)). The masculine noun "der Latte" means caffè latte. There's plenty of room for puns. :D
    jajaja...facinating that the feminine noun "einen latte" would refer to the most masculine of all things.
     

    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    the feminine noun "eine Latte"
    Indeed. This is because "die Latte" originally just meant (and still also means) "lath, bar" and similar words -- oblong wooden items used in construction. In this context, the gender of the noun is not interesting. ;)
     
    Well, in many languages the slang/vulgar word for "penis" is grammatically femenine: la polla, la bite, la minchia, mentula in Latin...
    +
    La pija, la pinga.
    H πούτσα [i ˈpu.ʦ͡a]/η ψωλή [i p͡sɔˈli] (MoGr), η βίλλα [i ˈvi.lːa] (CypGr), ἡ ληκώ [heː leːˈkoː]/ἡ πόσθη [heː ˈpo.stʰeː] (AncGr), all feminine :cool:
     

    Rocko!

    Senior Member
    Español - México
    Mexico:

    La tiene parada... / la tengo parada... /
    Se le paró... / se me paró... /
    Se le puso dura.. / Se me puso dura... /


    ... + la verga.
     
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    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Cymraeg/Welsh

    Roedd ganddo godiad

    was by-him SOFT MUTATION rise
    He had a rise/an erection
    (Standard, not vulgar)

    In the following ... 'Roedd ganddo ...' ( He had ...) starts the sentence.

    ... galedffwrch (A play on 'Caledfwlch', King Arthur's sword 'Excalibur')
    ... bolyn pen piws (A puce coloured pole)
    ... gat (a semi-erection)
    ... fîn-potal (an erection due to 'the bottle' , i.e. Viagra)
    ... fîn (literally, 'an edge')
    ... wynt yn yr hwyliau (literally, 'wind in the sails')
    ... fîn inja-roc (very hard erection like 'rock' - the sweet variety, NOT a big stone)
    ... bidlen bren (a wooden penis. cf. Am E 'to have wood')
    ... fîn gwyllt (Lit. 'a wild edge' i.e. an erection owing to fright)

    Finally, the old English joke.

    "News just in. There has been a burglary at the Viagra factory. Police are looking for a pair of hardened criminals."

    Do you get it? :)

    And then there is this true news story:

    Free erections? Tesco’s embarrassing cash machine translation mishap
     
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    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    The source is the on-line Welsh swearing dictionary - y Rhegiadur. Unfortunately, if you don't understand my language you can't understand it, as it's monolingual.,
     

    Jennifer Weiss

    Senior Member
    Icelandic / Swedish
    What did I just walk into?
    Anyway we say "standpína" in Icelandic and "ståkuk" in Swedish.
    "Ständer" / "Latte" in German.
    "Pija" and "verga" are commonly used in Latin America (verga is more Mexican as far as I know).
    Russians say "стояк". (pretty sure the word is more or less the same for other Slavic languages).

    I warn you against googling any of the words. :D
     

    Jennifer Weiss

    Senior Member
    Icelandic / Swedish
    These are common Latin American slang words for the male organ, not specifically for an erection though. The fomer is more Argentine, the later more Mexican.
    Ah, my Spanish suggestions were a complete miss then. What can I say? Not an expert over here.
    Anyway, a good question arises what other words are used across Latin America.
     
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    TitTornade

    Senior Member
    Good morning Alfafalfa, thank your very much for the interesting comment I appreciate it very much since it is Italian and what's more a dialect. But how would you say: He had a hard-on? Does the verb intostare apply to the penis or to the man (like in French)? Thanks
    In French, we have several verbs that apply generally to the man and, for some, to the penis :) :

    - bander (I would say, the most common) : to bend
    and its opposite : débander (to lose one's hard-on)

    - triquer / avoir la trique ; trique = big stick

    - avoir la gaule ; gaule = fishing pole or pole picker

    - avoir le gourdin ; gourdin = big stick, club

    - avoir une érection / être en érection

    - durcir : to become hard, to harden

    - raidir : to stiffen

    - être au garde-à-vous : to stand to attention (military)

    Plus, we can say :

    - bander/triquer comme un âne (have got a hard-on like a donkey)

    - bander/triquer comme un taureau (have got a hard-on like a bull)

    - bander/triquer comme un cerf (have got a hard-on like a deer)

    Well, in many languages the slang/vulgar word for "penis" is grammatically femenine: la polla, la bite, la minchia, mentula in Latin...
    In French, we have :
    la bite, la queue, la teub, la pine, la quéquette...
    and
    le pénis, le zizi, le dard, le zob, le vit, le chibre, le braquemard, l'engin, le membre (viril)...
    etc., etc.

    Masculine or feminine as you need / want :):)
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    What did I just walk into?
    Anyway we say "standpína" in Icelandic and "ståkuk" in Swedish.
    "Ständer" / "Latte" in German.
    "Pija" and "verga" are commonly used in Latin America (verga is more Mexican as far as I know).
    Russians say "стояк". (pretty sure the word is more or less the same for other Slavic languages).

    I warn you against googling any of the words. :D
    Good morning Jennifer and welcome to the All languages forum.
    You have just walked into a thread where people talk about some phrases maybe useful for everday life and help people to learn new phrases. Phrases like that are commonest in life than you could imagine. I hope we will see you here in All languages forum a lot. Feel free to participate in other threads, too. Have a nice weekend. Enco.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    - bander (I would say, the most common) : to bend
    and its opposite : débander (to lose one's hard-on)
    Good morning Tit and thank you for your participation here.
    Débander - it is really fabulous you have a word like that. That verb must be unique!!!
     

    bandini

    Senior Member
    inglés gabacho aunque vivo en Mexico
    Had a Cuban girlfriend once and she said "pinga." In Mexico there are many words but the most common and vulgar is "verga" and lots of girls believe you can predict a guys size by measuring his feet. Dicen que entre más patón más vergón. :)
     
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