He has a heart <like/of> flint/granite

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  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    The difference is that I did not see anyone recommending "like" in that reference thread and I myself would never say it... :)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    From the perspective of usage, I suppose - I've not heard like used that way.

    But maybe someone else will like it. :)
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    They are not both metaphorical. One is a simile and one is a metaphor. A metaphor is usually more emphatic than a simile but the meaning is the same.
     

    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    Can you please tell me what is "metaphor" and what is "simile"?
    And between this two which one falls in which category?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Can you please tell me what is "metaphor" and what is "simile"?
    And between this two which one falls in which category?
    He has a heart like flint/granite and he has eyes like a hawk are similes (the word "like" indicates a comparison.)

    He has a heart of flint/granite and He has the eyes of a hawk are metaphors.

    Whether we are more likely to use a simile or a metaphor in a particular situation depends, among others things, on whether there are more-or-less set expressions using a similar form.

    I would say that "he has eyes like a hawk" is a more-or-less set expression; if you used "he has the eyes of a hawk", you would be doing so in order to make what you say more unusual, more striking.

    As regards "he has a heart of flint/granite", the common expression is "he has a heart of stone". So using "he has a heart of flint/granite" is already striking, because it takes you a step away from the common expression. "He has a heart like flint/granite" takes you two steps away from the usual expression. I think it actually weakens what you're saying....:(
     
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