He <has got> <has> <does have> a stomach ache.

Creature from the Sun

Senior Member
Russian, K-Paxian
Dear Gurus,
1. Can we say that A and B, in general, have the same meaning? Both work well, while A - AmE, B - BrE, right?
2. However, if we think in details, 'He has ...' means just the fact of the present state (He has a pen. / He has a cold) and "He has got" means a kind of changing in the person's state (before he wasn't ill and then fell ill)
A Has he got a stomach ache? - Yes, he has. He has got a stomach ache.
B Does he have a stomach ache? - Yes, he does. He has a stomach ache. / He does have a stomach ache.

Thanks.
 
Last edited:
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    B is what would mainly be used in AE, I think. Both work fine in BE.

    But has and has got mean exactly the same as each other (get is not being used in the sense of become in this context).

    And in “he does have…”, the word does serves to emphasise the statement. It’s what you would use to contradict somebody, e.g. I don’t think he really has a stomachache. / Yes, he does have one.
     

    Creature from the Sun

    Senior Member
    Russian, K-Paxian
    B is what would mainly be used in AE, I think. Both work fine in BE.

    But has and has got mean exactly the same as each other (get is not being used in the sense of become in this context).

    And in “he does have…”, the word does serves to emphasise the statement. It’s what you would use to contradict somebody, e.g. I don’t think he really has a stomachache. / Yes, he does have one.
    Thank you so much, lingobingo, for your clear-cut explanation! I got the point.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Note that "have got" is rather more colloquial than "have", and is very often contracted. Apart from that, as lingo says, there's no difference:

    In BE you can even use both forms in the same sentence, if you wish.
    - Have they both got a stomach ache?
    - No. He's got/he has a stomach ache; she has/she's got appendicitis.

    - I see you have a new bike; I've got a new car.
     

    Creature from the Sun

    Senior Member
    Russian, K-Paxian
    Note that "have got" is rather more colloquial than "have", and is very often contracted. Apart from that, as lingo says, there's no difference:

    In BE you can even use both forms in the same sentence, if you wish.
    - Have they both got a stomach ache?
    - No. He's got/he has a stomach ache; she has/she's got appendicitis.

    - I see you have a new bike; I've got a new car.
    Many thanks, velisarius.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top