He has no job. / He doesn't have any job.

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Creature from the Sun

Senior Member
Russian, K-Paxian
Dear Gurus,
Please tell me is the following question (Q) idiomatic:
Q: What's your brothers job?

and what is the difference between those answers:

A. He has no job. He is a student
B. He doesn't have any job. He is only 14 years old.

Thanks!
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I agree: 'a' is more natural than either of those, with one of the negations of 'have':

    He hasn't got a job.
    He doesn't have a job.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Agreed. But another, perhaps more likely, answer in this case would be: “He doesn’t work. He’s still at school.”
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Please tell me is the following question (Q) idiomatic:
    Q: What's your brothers job?
    Yes, but more idiomatic is "What does your brother do for a living?". If context permits, "for a living" at the end can be omitted and is then implied.
    Is it proper to say “He is jobless. He’s still at school.”?
    Not really, because words like jobless and unemployed tend to mean that someone who you would expect to be working doesn't have a job.
    We would not expect someone who is still at school to have a job.
     

    Creature from the Sun

    Senior Member
    Russian, K-Paxian
    B. He doesn't have a job.
    Sorry for the delay in responding - that was crazy wekend!

    Thank you, S1m0n!
    Does it mean that we can go the same way with:
    A. "What's your brother's car? - He doesn't have a car."
    B. "Who's your brother's girlfriend? - He doesn't have a girlfriend."
    C. "Please give me a pen. - I don't have a pen". ?
     

    Creature from the Sun

    Senior Member
    Russian, K-Paxian
    Yes, but more idiomatic is "What does your brother do for a living?". If context permits, "for a living" at the end can be omitted and is then implied.

    Not really, because words like jobless and unemployed tend to mean that someone who you would expect to be working doesn't have a job.
    We would not expect someone who is still at school to have a job.
    Thank you, Edinburgher!
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    "What's your brother's car?:cross: - He doesn't have a car.:tick:"
    Yes, the answers with a are correct. You need to rewrite the car question though, using 'make of' or 'sort of' car and the verb 'have'.
     
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