He has written the lesson at five o'clock.

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nado92

Senior Member
arabic
is it wrong to use "at" with present perfect as a time preposition , as in

He has written the lesson at five o'clock.


Should (at) be (since)?
 
  • sandpiperlily

    Senior Member
    That sentence makes no sense.

    He wrote the lesson at five o'clock = At 5:00, he was sitting and writing the lesson. He is done now.

    He wrote the lesson for five o'clock = Sometime before 5:00, he wrote a lesson which was intended to take place at 5:00

    He has written the lesson for five o'clock = basically same as above.

    He has been writing the lesson since 5:00 = He started writing the lesson at 5:00, and is still writing it now.
     
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    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Grammatical rules often state this -> Present perfect isn't used with a temporal (time) reference. It's not about "at" here (which is correct), but the more general present perfect choice.

    *I have gone there last week
    *He has been there last year

    I went there last week :tick:
    He went there last year :tick:

    So "at 5 o'clock" implies you need the past simple tense.
     

    nado92

    Senior Member
    arabic
    This sentence is taken from an exam. This way:

    find the mistake:

    He has written the lesson at five o'clock.

    It wasn't in a context.

    Thank you all for your kind help.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This sentence is taken from an exam. This way:

    find the mistake:

    He has written the lesson at five o'clock.

    It wasn't in a context.

    Thank you all for your kind help.
    From what's been said above, it should be clear that the mistake is "has written"

    He has written the lesson at five o'clock.

    He wrote the lesson at five o'clock.
     

    nado92

    Senior Member
    arabic
    From what's been said above, it should be clear that the mistake is "has written"

    He has written the lesson at five o'clock.

    He wrote the lesson at five o'clock.

    I agree with you.

    But others wanted it to be so

    He has written the lesson since five o'clock.

    to teach this rule

    it's wrong to use "at" with present perfect as a time preposition .
     
    Last edited:

    sandpiperlily

    Senior Member
    I agree with you.

    But others wanted it to be so

    He has written the lesson since five o'clock.

    to teach this rule

    it's wrong to use "at" with present perfect as a time preposition .
    "He has written the lesson since five o'clock" does not make sense to me.

    If he is still writing the lesson, it should be "he has been writing the lesson since five o'clock."

    You can use "has [pastparticiple] since [time]," but this would represent some repeating action over a long period of time. For example, "he has written his lessons out by hand since he became a teacher," or "she has cut her hair that way since she was a little girl."
     
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I agree with you.

    But others wanted it to be so

    He has written the lesson since five o'clock.

    to teach this rule

    it's wrong to use "at" with present perfect as a time preposition .
    I see what you mean, and I suppose the "since" sentence may be grammatically correct. But it makes a sort of a freaky noise to my ears. I can't explain why that should be. I think it's because that is not how I would express what I think the sentence means.

    I'm likely to dismiss as possible answers sentences that don't sound natural. Or perhaps, to be honest, I wouldn't even think of them :)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The purpose of the thread is to respond to the question asked.
    There was some confusion at the beginning, but it then became clear in post #7.

    Please respect the topic of the thread.

    If you wish to take a sentence and disect it in a way that is not related to the thread topic, you are always welcome to do so. But please do that on a separate thread - linked, if you wish, to the original thread.
     
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