He hit the cane against the wall.

min1127

Senior Member
Korean- Republic of Korea
Hello. I want to know if the preposition in the sentence can be replaced by other preposition.

This is the original sentence.

He hit the cane against the wall.

Can I replace "against" with "on" as "He hit the cane on the wall"? Is it grammatical and does it convey the meaning well?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Both are grammatically correct, but I cannot imagine them being used, at least not without some specific context and in AE.

    Try: He hit the wall with his cane.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Against tends to imply a vertical surface; on tends to imply a horizontal surface.

    And then there is always "He hit the wall with his stick" that implies nothing as far as surfaces are concerned.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    He hit the cane against the wall.

    Can I replace "against" with "on" as "He hit the cane on the wall"? Is it grammatical and does it convey the meaning well?
    These sentences could also describe
    There was a cane (walking stick) leaning against the wall. He hit it with his hand.
    There was a cane (walking stick) or cane (wall-covering made of canes) mounted on the wall. He hit it with his hand.
     
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