He is off in the watery blue distance

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omidnice

Senior Member
Turkish - Azerbaijani
Hi everybody!

I think the bold part means 'he is out of his job in some place', doesn't it? If so, what's the meaning of 'the watery blue distance'?

If it weren't such a futility. When he is off in the watery blue distance, I can put him fine lines and maybe a two-dollar bill; one or the other may have its use. But when he is here (and how little he is here) it is not possible to speak the fine lines. For the most part, it is impossible to speak a line at all.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/books/first/d/duberstein-sailor.html

Thank you in advance.:)
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    The quote is from "The Handsome Sailor" by Larry Duberstein.

    After reading the context, omidnice, I think that "When he is off in the watery blue distance" means "when he is working as a sailor at sea and is not here at home".
     
    Last edited:

    omidnice

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Azerbaijani
    Hello, omidnice. Now would be a good time for you to look at the rules about mentioning your source in the forum. You have forgotten to mention the author and the title of the work that you linked to. The rules require all members to write the author's name and the title of the text that is being quoted. A blank link is not enough. Thank you.
    I will mention the source like this. Thank you for your reminding!

    After reading the context, omidnice, I think that "When he is off in the watery blue distance" means "when he is working as a sailor at sea and is not here at home".
    I am sure you're right, and I can feel the role of mentioning the source completely!:)
     
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