He is reliable sociable man

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mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
Are both correct?
He is reliable sociable man.
He is sociable reliable man.
Thanks.
 
  • roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    You are asking if you can say:

    (Pronoun) (verb) (adjective) (adjective) (noun).

    I will say "yes" because I can say many sentences such as:
    "She saw the pretty, white house."

    I would add a comma or a pause between the two adjectives.

    You may want to use the "and" conjuntion to link it together.
    He is a reliable, and sociable man.

    It doesn't matter what order the adjectives go :).
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    You need an "a" (article) in either sentence. Otherwise both are OK.

    Putting "and" or a comma between the adjectives makes them both modify "man" equally. Without "and" or a comma, the first adjective modifies the rest.

    Here are some more examples to illustrate:

    He is a little old man. [He is an old man who is little (e.g. from age).]
    He is an old little man. [He is a little man (little even when he was young) who is old.]
    He is a little, old man. [He is a man who is both old and little (perhaps no connection).]
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Thank you, roxcyn and Twin, for helping me.
    You corrected the sentence, showed me that I could put a comma or "and" in the sentence to make it clearer.
    Thanks.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Putting "and" or a comma between the adjectives makes them both modify "man" equally. Without "and" or a comma, the first adjective modifies the rest.
    Hi, Forero.
    This is what I am interested most because my teacher have never told me about that before.
    Thanks.
     

    Little_LIS

    Senior Member
    Arabic,Egypt
    You are asking if you can say:

    (Pronoun) (verb) (adjective) (adjective) (noun).

    I will say "yes" because I can say many sentences such as:
    "She saw the pretty, white house."

    I would add a comma or a pause between the two adjectives.

    You may want to use the "and" conjuntion to link it together.
    He is a reliable, and sociable man.

    It doesn't matter what order the adjectives go :).
    So, are both right ?
    He's a reliable, social man. Or, " He's a reliable and social man" ?

    I just wanted to make sure :)

    Thanks in advance:)
     
    Last edited:

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi,
    Are both correct?
    He is reliable sociable man.
    He is sociable reliable man.
    Thanks.
    Hello, Mimi. It's great to meet you again here.

    If you apply Forero's principles, that means there is a difference:

    He is a reliable sociable man - he is a sociable man who is reliable.
    He is a sociable reliable man - he is a reliable man who is sociable.

    Both are pretty odd things to say, because to my ear they suggest that sociable men and reliable men are categories into which people place males of the species.

    That makes me think that you need one of the versions with a comma after the first adjective. I don't think it matters much in which order you place the adjectives.
     
    Last edited:

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Hi, Dr. Suzy.

    Yes, they are both right, though a little unusual. It is hard for me to think reliable and social (or sociable, for that matter) at the same time without further context to tell me whether they refer to personality, ways of doing business, or something else. Depending on what you mean, it might be better to say "social, but reliable", "reliable, if social", or some other form that relates the two ideas to each other.

    It is to be noted that social and sociable are different words, but the same principle applies: such constructions are grammatical with and, or with a comma.

    I notice a slight difference in the meaning between the version with and and the version with the comma.

    "He is a reliable and social man" says simply that he is both reliable and social in some complementary way.

    "He is a reliable, social man" seems to say that he is reliable, and more importantly, he is social. Or it might mean, if this makes sense, that he is reliable because he is social.

    With just two adjectives, a comma followed by and gives it yet another meaning, which requires another comma:

    He is a reliable, and social, man.

    In this case we are interrupting the sentence "He is a reliable man" to inject that he is social too. To me this suggests that his being social really is what is important.

    Grammaticality is one thing, but these sentences about a man being reliable and either social or sociable really need context to make much sense.
     
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