He likes to fiddle with different ideas and successfully.

salai

Senior Member
Russian
Hello,

Does the way the expression "to fiddle with" make sense in this context?
- Our CEO is always on the move and likes to fiddle with different ideas and successfully, I should say.
- That`s why you are among the leaders in the field. Our managers aren`t so good at taking the plunge.
- It`s always risky. But rolling with the punches opens more opportunities.
Thank you in advance.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I would prefer play with or play around with. Fiddle has an implied amateurism to it.

    PS, I think it would also read better if there were a so after successfully.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think that this CEO sounds brave and open minded. Maybe he likes to 'experiment with new ideas' or maybe he likes to 'entertain new ideas'. As Paul says, 'fiddling' has amateurish connotations, it also makes the CEO sound as though they're interfering or tinkering with the ideas - not good.
    Please tell us your source.
     

    salai

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think that this CEO sounds brave and open minded. Maybe he likes to 'experiment with new ideas' or maybe he likes to 'entertain new ideas'. As Paul says, 'fiddling' has amateurish connotations, it also makes the CEO sound as though they're interfering or tinkering with the ideas - not good.
    Please tell us your source.
    Dear Beryl from Northallerton,
    One of the idioms attached to this particular unit is "to fiddle with"; the definition given is 'to work with, to experiment with."
    My colleague and I have been assigned with a task to compile a video course based on these idioms to offer as a kind of an online book for students.
    The lines I posted are from my colleague's story. Students have also been assigned with a similar task, that's why I have been posting so many questions regarding idiom usage on the forum.
    My feeling is that the intention was to show that the CEO is always open to innovative ideas, but for a non-native speaker it is sometimes difficult to see all these subtleties of the language, as is the case with this expression.
    Here are more lines to give you an idea:
    - The introduction of new technologies will require new people. Do you think it will be easy to find those who will fill the bill?
    - I hope, we`ll manage. Anyway, we will need a much savvier workforce.
    - It looks like your management have decided to raise the industry bar.
    - Moreover, they are going to diversify into OSPs.
    - You should have the guts to start such considerable changes now.
    - That`s true. Our CEO is always on the move and likes to fiddle with different ideas and successfully so, I should say.
    - That`s why you are among the leaders in the field. Our managers aren`t so good at taking the plunge.
    - It`s always risky, but rolling with the punches opens more opportunities
     
    Last edited:

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello,

    Does the way the expression "to fiddle with" make sense in this context?
    - Our CEO is always on the move and likes to fiddle with different ideas and successfully, I should say.
    - That`s why you are among the leaders in the field. Our managers aren`t so good at taking the plunge.
    - It`s always risky. But rolling with the punches opens more opportunities.
    Thank you in advance.
    likes to fiddle with different ideas - to fiddle with is a common idiom with several meanings: here I don't think it's being used appropriately. The CEO is probably fiddling with the running of the company by experimenting with ideas.

    Our managers aren`t so good at taking the plunge. - to take the plunge is a common idiom usually meaning to throw oneself into something which one perceives as more risky than it really is: the metaphor is from diving into water. I'd call this a reasonable use of the expression.

    But rolling with the punches opens more opportunities. - to roll with the punches is not a very common idiom (only one example in the BNC), meaning to absorb setbacks and adjust to them: the metaphor is from boxing. The playlet presents this in contrast to taking the plunge, which is an inappropriate contradistinction, I'd say. I wouldn't really know what the sentence was saying; I suspect that many BE speakers would say it's better to be proactive.

    You know what I feel about your enterprise, Salai. I don't envy you this work.
     

    salai

    Senior Member
    Russian
    likes to fiddle with different ideas - to fiddle with is a common idiom with several meanings: here I don't think it's being used appropriately. The CEO is probably fiddling with the running of the company by experimenting with ideas.

    Our managers aren`t so good at taking the plunge. - to take the plunge is a common idiom usually meaning to throw oneself into something which one perceives as more risky than it really is: the metaphor is from diving into water. I'd call this a reasonable use of the expression.

    But rolling with the punches opens more opportunities. - to roll with the punches is not a very common idiom (only one example in the BNC), meaning to absorb setbacks and adjust to them: the metaphor is from boxing. The playlet presents this in contrast to taking the plunge, which is an inappropriate contradistinction, I'd say. I wouldn't really know what the sentence was saying; I suspect that many BE speakers would say it's better to be proactive.

    You know what I feel about your enterprise, Salai. I don't envy you this work.
    Thank you very much indeed for the understanding. Apart from the scripts there have to be accompanying matching and multiple-choice exercises, summaries of each unit in Ukrainian, and twelve cartoons.
     
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