He loved her <from, since> the day he first met her.

casino

Senior Member
Japanese
Can we say the following?

He loved her from/ since the day he first met her.
He has loved her from/ since the day he first met her.

Casino
 
  • Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Can we say the following?

    He loved her from/ since the day he first met her.
    He has loved her from/ since the day he first met her.

    Casino

    He has loved her since the day he first met her.
    He loved her from the day he first met her.
     

    take it easy

    New Member
    italy, italian
    Can we say the following?

    He loved her from/ since the day he first met her.
    He has loved her from/ since the day he first met her.

    Casino

    Hi, if he loves her also now I think is correct to say "he has loved her since he met her". If he probably loves her also tomorow you can say "he has been loving her since he met her". I think that you use the simple past for a love in the past. I loved her two years ago.

    Please someone correct me if I wrote something wrong
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "It was love at first sight."

    It sounds like it means "he fell in love with here when he first laid eyes on her."

    There is no implication that the love was long lasting (but we can hope for the best).
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    "It was love at first sight."

    It sounds like it means "he fell in love with here when he first laid eyes on her."

    There is not implication that the love was long lasting (but we can hope for the best).

    Oh, you just have to joke about everything, don't you? :D

    (a line from movie "Original Sin")
    --The moment I saw her, I loved her.

    If "he" is still in love with "her", I would go for:
    --He has been loving her/in love with her since they first met.
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    He has loved her since the day he first met her.
    He loved her from the day he first met her.

    Does this mean that past tense + from the day and present perfect+ since the day is correct? Thanks.

    I haven't talked to him since the day he lied to me.
    I didn't talk to him from the day he lied to me.
     
    Last edited:

    DonnyB

    Moderator Emeritus
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Does this mean that past tense + from the day and present perfect+ since the day is correct? Thanks.

    I haven't talked to him since the day he lied to me.
    I didn't talk to him from the day he lied to me.
    They both work, but (1) suggests to me that you're still not talking to him now, whereas (2) refers to events sometime in the past and doesn't specify what then happened afterwards.
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    They both work, but (1) suggests to me that you're still not talking to him now, whereas (2) refers to events sometime in the past and doesn't specify what then happened afterwards.

    Thank you. So would it be possible to say "I haven't talked to him from the day he lied to me."? Thanks.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It would be possible but not idiomatic. Since is used with the present and past perfect, from with the past tense. See post #3 at the beginning of this old thread.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    :thumbsup: I agree. It’s a good example of the continuous aspect not being appropriate for stative verbs. There are plenty of exceptions to this “rule”, but that isn’t one of them.
     
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