he " out of uniform \ in civil " works as a bodyguard of the royal family.

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Egoexpress

Senior Member
Hungary, Hungarian
Hi,

I'm scratching my head, but still, I cannot find the proper term for "out of uniform".

Think of a soldier, he " out of uniform \ in civil " works as a bodyguard of the royal family.

Thanks.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In BrE, at least, the term is "in civvies", short for "in civilian clothes".

    I'm not sure we'd use it in your example, however: we'd be more likely to say "when off-duty..."

    Edit: having seen Magda's post below, I realise there are two possibilities.

    Either the soldier works as a bodyguard in his free time (when he's "off-duty").
    Or his job as a soldier is to work as a bodyguard and when he does so, he wears civilian clothes.
     
    Does he work as a bodyguard at the same time as having some military duties (let's say morning - in uniform, evening - plainclothes body guard)? Or, perhaps, he's been drafted into the army, but his usual job is being the bodyguard?
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Ununiformed, .
    I don't think I'd use the word ununiformed because to me it would imply he isn't complying to one principle, standard, or rule.

    I'd say the best words are civvies and plain clothes, as these always imply someone who is generally in uniform as part of their job, but on this occasion they aren't.
     
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