He plays chess at (a / the / -) master level.

TommyGun

Senior Member
Russian
#1
Hello,

Imagine I am telling you about my friend John. Which ways can I say it?

1) He plays chess at the master level.
2) He plays chess at a master level.
3) He plays chess at master level.
 
  • NLmarkSE

    Senior Member
    Dutch (the Nederlands)
    #2
    Is the "master level" a predefined level? Like, some league that only the best players can enter? We need to know, because right now all sentences are grammatically correct, but should all be used in different cases.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    #3
    Is he an accredited chess master? If so, at which grade of master (Fide, national, international or grandmaster)?
    We would normally say, e.g. 'He is an International Master (or IM)'.

    If he has not qualified for a master title, but is strong enough to compete at that level, we could say, 'He plays chess to master level' (or 'at master level'); or we could say, 'He is of master strength'.
     
    Last edited:

    TommyGun

    Senior Member
    Russian
    #4
    Thank you.
    If he has not qualified for a master title, but is strong enough to compete at that level, we could say, 'He plays chess to master level' (or 'at master level'); or we could say, 'He is of master strength'.
    1. How would the sense of your examples change with the definite article?
    He plays chess to the master level. vs. He plays chess to master level.
    He plays chess at the master level. vs. He plays chess at master level.

    2. He plays chess at a master level.
    What does this sentence mean? I think it means that he is a very good player, but he is not necessary strong enough to compete at the (Fide, national, international) master level.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    #5
    He plays chess to master level.
    He plays chess at master level.

    We would not normally use either the definite or the indefinite article in these sentences.
     
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