He promised me to give everything I have/ would

Tyrion Lann

Senior Member
INDIA -Hindi
Hello everyone.

I was watching an American TV show, Desperate Housewives. And, at a particular scene the following line was said by an actor:
"Well, he promised to give me everything I've ever wanted".

I wonder, is it right, grammatically?

I would have said:
a. "Well, he promised to give me everything I would ever want."
b. Or, "Well, he promised to give me everything I had ever wanted."

c. Maybe, "Well, he promised he would give me everything "I would ever want/ I want."

Please throw some light on it.
Thanks.
 
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  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    It's fine as it is.

    Present perfect indicates everything he has ever wanted in the past and right up to this moment in the present.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Ever" is here a period of past time that continued to the present period. It therefore attracts the present perfect.
    - The past perfect is not used because the speaker regards the promise as having been given in the present period.
    - The promise does not include future wishes - which sounds like a sensible restriction to me!
     
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    Tyrion Lann

    Senior Member
    INDIA -Hindi
    "Well, he promised to give me everything I would ever be wanting"
    Does it sound good?
    And what about other alternatives: a,band c?
    Would they work out, too?
     

    Tyrion Lann

    Senior Member
    INDIA -Hindi
    Suppose: back then, he said " I will give you everything you want".

    In indirect form what would she say , now?

    "Well, he promised me that he would give me everything I wanted/ or I would want."

    To Barque: I put quotes only to emphasise that section of the sentence.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    In passive form what would she say , now?
    ...I wanted.
    I put quotes only to emphasise that section of the sentence.
    But that's not how quotes are used, and you didn't put in the closing marks for those words. There are closing marks there but they match the opening ones at the beginning of the sentence.

    Just to make it clear, I was referring to the ones in red:
    c. Maybe, "Well, he promised he would give me everything "I would ever want/ I want."
     

    Tyrion Lann

    Senior Member
    INDIA -Hindi
    ...I wanted.

    But that's not how quotes are used, and you didn't put in the closing marks for those words. There are closing marks there but they match the opening ones at the beginning of the sentence.

    Just to make it clear, I was referring to the ones in red:
    Ahh, I see.
    "Well, he promised me that he would give me everything 'I would ever want/ I wanted'."
    I think it would work, now.

    And, sorry I said in passive form but what I actually wanted to say was in indirec from.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    "Well, he promised me that he would give me everything 'I would ever want/ I wanted'."
    I think it would work, now.
    This means you'd actually used the specific words "I would ever want/I wanted" and he was referring to them. That isn't what your question says.

    Quotes aren't used for emphasis. The're used to show that the words within them were spoken/written and are being quoted verbatim.
     

    Tyrion Lann

    Senior Member
    INDIA -Hindi
    :D I knew it, but then I thought If I used "/" in between the quotes I would be able to emphasise that section of the sentence, for the reades, as my main concern, which apparently seems wrong.
    Thanks, Barque.
     
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