he said he was gonna tell you after he <speaks/spoke> to his manager

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sunsail

Senior Member
de langue Turc
Hello
which one is correct? and why

"he said he was gonna tell you after he spoke to his manager"
"he said he was gonna tell you after he speakes to his manager"

Thanks
 
  • liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Strictly speaking "gonna" is not correct at all, althought it's constantly used in spoken English. I don't believe "speakes" exists in English. Perhaps you mean "speaks"?

    According to the rules of the forum, you should attempt to answer the question yourself before asking us. Which one do you think is right, and why?
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    Strictly speaking "gonna" is not correct at all, althought it's constantly used in spoken English. I don't believe "speakes" exists in English. Perhaps you mean "speaks"?

    According to the rules of the forum, you should attempt to answer the question yourself before asking us. Which one do you think is right, and why?
    Of course it's "speaks" I mistyped it.I m hesitating I just want to be sure about it.Is not this reasonable for the forum?

    Hi Sunsail

    It depends on the context - please could you give us the sentences before and after?
    Actually in here I m telling a situation on the phone to someone.Here after/before of this sentence

    I attended meeting.In the meeting he was there.
    "he said he was gonna tell you after he spoke to his manager"
    "he said he was gonna tell you after he speakes to his manager"
    So I have to wait now for their decision.


    If it depends on the context, can you explain in which situations either of them are correct? I m hesitating about the time,spoke/speaks

    Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    :) what are these about then " gonna,wanna,gotta usages ? I saw these in a lot of places,newspapers,tvs
    Please see the extensive list of prior posts under gonna in the WRD.

    I can guarantee you that any journalist who insists upon writing such words for any reputable English-language newspaper, except as direct quotes and conveying the sense of the speaker being poorly educated or having poor enunciation, soon will be out of work.
     

    Broccolicious

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Actually in here I m telling a situation on the phone to someone.Here after/before of this sentence

    I attended meeting.In the meeting he was there.
    "he said he was gonna tell you after he spoke to his manager"
    "he said he was gonna tell you after he speakes to his manager"
    So I have to wait now for their decision.


    If it depends on the context, can you explain in which situations either of them are correct? I m hesitating about the time,spoke/speaks

    Thanks
    Hi Sunsail

    It's complicated (as usual!) so I hope this helps:

    1. 'He said he was going to tell you after he spoke to his manager.'
    (He spoke to his manager yesterday, so why hasn't he told you yet?)

    2. 'He said he was going to tell you after he speaks to his manager.'
    (He hasn't spoken to his manager yet, so you'll have to be patient.)

    3. 'He said he was going to tell you after he had spoken to his manager.'
    (But then he changed his mind, or something else happened to change that plan.)

    I'm not sure about that last one - for me its meaning is very similar to the first one. But I hope that's helpful somehow!

    Do please ask if you want more clarification - no sincere question is unreasonable here!

    Broc
     

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    Hi Sunsail

    It's complicated (as usual!) so I hope this helps:

    1. 'He said he was going to tell you after he spoke to his manager.'
    (He spoke to his manager yesterday, so why hasn't he told you yet?)

    2. 'He said he was going to tell you after he speaks to his manager.'
    (He hasn't spoken to his manager yet, so you'll have to be patient.)

    3. 'He said he was going to tell you after he had spoken to his manager.'
    (But then he changed his mind, or something else happened to change that plan.)

    I'm not sure about that last one - for me its meaning is very similar to the first one. But I hope that's helpful somehow!

    Do please ask if you want more clarification - no sincere question is unreasonable here!


    Broc
    yes it helps it is very brief thanks a lot.I think anyone reads my first post would guess I was searching some clarification.otherwise why would I ask this question?
    anyway thanks
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    Please see the extensive list of prior posts under gonna in the WRD.

    I can guarantee you that any journalist who insists upon writing such words for any reputable English-language newspaper, except as direct quotes and conveying the sense of the speaker being poorly educated or having poor enunciation, soon will be out of work.
    Long ago that might have been true, but it no longer is. Standard speakers are indeed depicted nowadays using gonna in newspapers and other news sources. Bill Gates, for example, is depicted in a transcript of an interview by Bill Moyers as using gonna, as can be see here. Senator John McCain is depicted by New York Times columnist Bob Herbert as using gonna, as can be seen here.

    There's no reason to believe that in either case the speaker was being singled out for either being uneducated or having poor enunciation: The intent was simply to represent how the man spoke, and this usage is nowadays pretty unremarkable--in American English, in any case, as the situation may be different in other branches of the language.

    And to the forum member who said that gonna is not an English word-I see now that it was you--That assessment makes no sense.
     
    Last edited:

    sunsail

    Senior Member
    de langue Turc
    Long ago that might have been true, but it no longer is. Standard speakers are indeed depicted nowadays using gonna in newspapers and other news sources. Bill Gates, for example, is depicted in a transcript of an interview by Bill Moyers as using gonna, as can be see here. Senator John McCain is depicted by New York Times columnist Bob Herbert as using gonna, as can be seen here.

    There's no reason to believe that in either case the speaker was being singled out for either being uneducated or having poor enunciation: The intent was simply to represent how the man spoke, and this usage is nowadays pretty unremarkable--in American English, in any case, as the situation may be different in other branches of the language.

    And to the forum member who said that gonna is not an English word-I see now that it was you--That assessment makes no sense.

    That's great :) I do not understand this.I think you do not imagine how it is confusing for non-natives when you make your comments and judgments about this kind of situations.
    It is ok you can tell what you think/perceive,but at least do not tell this as fact.Now whom should I trust :)?
    Because few times I saw "gonna,wanna" usages on newspapers and TV. So I thought that these are public media ,not street people,so I could use this structure.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    That's great :) I do not understand this.I think you do not imagine how it is confusing for non-natives when you make your comments and judgments about this kind of situations.
    It is ok you can tell what you think/perceive,but at least do not tell this as fact.Now whom should I trust :)?
    Because few times I saw "gonna,wanna" usages on newspapers and TV. So I thought that these are public media ,not street people,so I could use this structure.
    A rule-of-thumb which I follow myself is to avoid informal usages unless you have a good idea of how those you are addressing will react to the usage. (I use it in regard to French, which I speak as a second language.) Even I, who am very much in favor of using words such as gonna and wanna in dialog when it is useful to indicate to the reader what pronunciation was used, found your use of gonna jarring. You were asking about another matter but your use of gonna distracted from the question you were asking.

    You should also be aware that many people in this forum feel about gonna and wanna the same as they feel about using 2 for two and u for you. Those usages may have their place, but they are not welcome in this forum.
     
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