He (started to) walk away slowly

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Anfisa

Senior Member
Russian
I have this text is from book. If we remove <started to> and replace <walk> to <walked>, will the meaning of sentence change?
Jody started to walk slowly. The fawn watched him. It walked a few steps after Jody.
Thanks
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The heading of your thread has 'away', but your posting does not. The word makes a difference. If he walked away, he is now distant from his original position. If he started to walk away, then becoming distant was his intention, but something might have stopped him before he got far. He might have stopped after the fawn walked 'a few steps' (which is not far). That is, he can start to walk away without walking away. But if he starts to walk, he also walks.
     

    Anfisa

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Sorry, I missed word <away> in text. It is
    Jody started to walk away slowly. The fawn watched him. It walked a few steps after Jody.

    Yes something have stopped him before he got far
    Jody started to walk away slowly. The fawn watched him. It walked a few steps after Jody, then he bleated sadly. He picked it up and carried it over his two arms.

    <We have to assume that Jody is standing still in the previous text.>
    He don't went far distance.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It depends on what you want to say.

    He walked slowly.
    He walked away slowly.
    He walked away.
    He started to walk.
    He started to walk slowly.
    He started to walk away.
    He started to walk away slowly.


    They're all possible. They're all grammatical. But each one has its own meaning.
     

    Anfisa

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks
    If we replace all these options in original sentence, could you explain differences?
     
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