he steak and kidney in the saucepan was 'catching on the bottom'.

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winklepicker

Senior Member
English (UK)
One for the cooks amongst us:

My wife took great offence this evening when I told her that the steak and kidney in the saucepan was 'catching on the bottom'.

In discussion, it transpired she thought I meant catching fire - but I just meant sticking.

Chambers was on my side (ish), offering catch=catch fire (no flames so obviously not relevant!) and catch=adhere.

What would other foreros think I meant?
 
  • Kevman

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I also knew what you meant when I read it, but I can see her point, too.
    (I am so not going to take sides on this issue on Valentine's Day! :p)


    I think it depends on your interpretation of "bottom": sticking on the bottom of the pan / catching fire on the bottom of the meat.
     

    Ecossaise

    Senior Member
    English
    One for the cooks amongst us:

    My wife took great offence this evening when I told her that the steak and kidney in the saucepan was 'catching on the bottom'.

    In discussion, it transpired she thought I meant catching fire - but I just meant sticking.

    Chambers was on my side (ish), offering catch=catch fire (no flames so obviously not relevant!) and catch=adhere.

    What would other foreros think I meant?

    It's the term I would have used.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Yet another BE/AE distinction?

    A yank might (in my wilder lingoistic fantasies?) have thought you meant it was a fattening meal.

    Now, if your wife has firey thoughts on Valentines day, all is well with the world.
     
    One for the cooks amongst us:

    My wife took great offence this evening when I told her that the steak and kidney in the saucepan was 'catching on the bottom'.

    In discussion, it transpired she thought I meant catching fire - but I just meant sticking.

    Chambers was on my side (ish), offering catch=catch fire (no flames so obviously not relevant!) and catch=adhere.

    What would other foreros think I meant?

    Chambers did not have to argue with wives then. Again, it is quite clear what you mean but it sounds somehow non-standard.
     

    RocketGirl

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    If I get my sleeve caught in the door, it's clearly stuck, not catching fire. However, I rarely hear 'catch' used in the present progressive to mean 'sticking'.

    I would have either said that dinner "is caught" on the bottom or that it "is sticking".

    Hope that makes sense. As for your sentence, "catching fire" crossed my mind for a split second, but that thought was quickly replaced with "sticking"
     
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