He stroked that hard, reassuring smoothness ever so slightly

Bushwhacker

Senior Member
Catalan
What does it mean in the following paragraph "stroke that hard" "reassuring smoothness ever so lightly" and "out of long habit"?

Context is that of a man who has strapped a knife to his forearm, under sleeves, and fingertips its hilt, and then..."He stroked that hard, reassuring smoothness ever so slightly, out of long habit."

This "that hard", is it meaning "muy fuerte"?

Translation: Dio un golpe con gran fuerza (contundentemente), asegurándose muy levemente de la lisura (del mango), por hábito de hacía mucho"

Thanks for assistance.
 
Last edited:
  • ml57

    Member
    English
    I think you have parsed it incorrectly.
    He stroked ever so slightly: like running your hand over a cat or a dog, gently.

    stroked what?

    that

    what is 'that'?

    that hard, reassuring smoothness: the characteristics that make up the knife.

    hard as duro, not fuerte.

    out of long habit: idiomatic phrase meaning he has done this for so long and so often that he does it without thinking and without any real purpose.
     

    Bushwhacker

    Senior Member
    Catalan
    No, it isn't strike. "Stroke" means to caress gently.
    So what they are trying to say is that he caressed the hard handle of the knife as he found it reassuring.

    I see. Thanks; my fault, I thought it was the pp of strike. But you mean that he strokes the hilt in order to feel reassuring himself?

    Thank You
     

    ml57

    Member
    English
    pp of strike=struck :)

    But you mean that he strokes the hilt in order to feel reassuring e himself? : yes, in an unthinking way
     

    Bushwhacker

    Senior Member
    Catalan
    I think you have parsed it incorrectly.
    He stroked ever so slightly: like running your hand over a cat or a dog, gently.

    stroked what?

    that

    what is 'that'?

    that hard, reassuring smoothness: the characteristics that make up the knife.

    hard as duro, not fuerte.

    out of long habit: idiomatic phrase meaning he has done this for so long and so often that he does it without thinking and without any real purpose.

    Thank You very much. So he is not searching to be reassured. It is the smoothness of the hilt, which is at the same time hard, what conveys the feeling of being comfortable?

    QUite a mess, I know. Thank You
     

    Bigote Blanco

    Senior Member
    He strokes the side of the blade, in my opinion the word "hilt" is not correct in this sentence. The hilt is to top protective part of the handle. You stroke the hard, flat side of the blade.
    He strokes the blade to reassure himself.
     

    Bushwhacker

    Senior Member
    Catalan
    He strokes the side of the blade, in my opinion the word "hilt" is not correct in this sentence. The hilt is to top protective part of the handle. You stroke the hard, flat side of the blade.
    He strokes the blade to reassure himself.
    Hilt is the word written. Thank You anyway for your kind and helpful attention.
     

    spodulike

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "He stroked that hard, reassuring smoothness ever so slightly, out of long habit."

    To parse it more completely ...

    "He stroked the smoothness" (It doesn´t say whether he is stroking the smoothness of the blade or the smoothness of the hilt in the actual quotation that you give)

    "The smoothness was both hard and reassuring"

    "He stroked it ever so slightly" means "He stroked it just a little bit"

    "out of long habit" He had a habit of stroking the knife thus.
     

    Bushwhacker

    Senior Member
    Catalan
    "He stroked that hard, reassuring smoothness ever so slightly, out of long habit."

    To parse it more completely ...

    "He stroked the smoothness" (It doesn´t say whether he is stroking the smoothness of the blade or the smoothness of the hilt in the actual quotation that you give)

    "The smoothness was both hard and reassuring"

    "He stroked it ever so slightly" means "He stroked it just a little bit"

    "out of long habit" He had a habit of stroking the knife thus.
    Thank You so much. Very kind. I've already understood it.
     
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