He tenido / tenía

< Previous | Next >

Dreammm

Senior Member
Italian - Italy
Which is the correct?
Ayer tenía fiebre.
Ayer he tenido fiebre.
Ayer estuve con fiebre.
Gracias.
 
  • duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Depends on the geographical zone. For me, 'Ayer tuve fiebre' is way more common than 'he estado con/he tenido'.
     

    Milton Sand

    Senior Member
    Español (Colombia)
    Which is the correct?
    Ayer tenía fiebre.
    Ayer he tenido fiebre.
    Ayer estuve con fiebre.
    Gracias.
    Hi,

    This is the way I feel it:

    Ayer tenía fiebre. <—Way more common around here. Better if «ayer» is considered a past-and-finished period of time within which the fever started and ended.
    Ayer he tenido fiebre. <—An action that has taken place at least once lately or has finished early in the present period of time (a month, a week, a day, the morning, this hour).
    Ayer estuve con fiebre. <—Not common, a bit more dramatic perhaps.
    Ayer teníaor estaba confiebre. <— The action was started in the past.

    Regards,
    ;)
     
    Last edited:

    BetoColina

    New Member
    Spanish-Mexico
    Well, my friend let me tell you something, both options are OK. However, each of them are used in different social contexts, for instances, in Latin America you will usually hear "ayer tuve fiebre" and in Spain they say "ayer yo he tenido fiebre". Nevertheless, if you say "ayer tenía fiebre", you will refer that the fever started one day before and it possibly ended the same day. So that means, by a little period of time yesterday.
     

    Milton Sand

    Senior Member
    Español (Colombia)
    ... and in Spain they say "ayer yo he tenido fiebre".
    No, they don't.

    They would say: hoy/esta semana he tenido fiebre. But not: "ayer he tenido fiebre".
    Yes, if not incorrect, at least it is very unusual; would sound wrong in most contexts to combine a finished time like “ayer” with an early completed action like “he tenido fiebre”. However, it also depends on the speaker's feeling about the finished action still having or not any effect, impact for influence in the present. For example, the speaker might still feel impressed for having had fever, or the fever might have caused him further complications:

    Me estoy hidratando muy bien, que ayer he tenido mucha fiebre. <—Anyway, Latinamericans would still say “que ayer tuve...”, and the latter sounds correct in Spain too.

    Around here, we do say, "¡Ayer he tenido una fiebre altísima!"; even though we don'tuse the pretérito compuesto as often as the Spaniards, we frequently resort to it as an expressive tool to add a bit of drama. Thus, the pretérito compuesto helps us "in the now" to highlight or recall somehow the emotional impact that the past action might have caused no matter how far in time.

    I hope I'm not messing it up.

    Regards, guys,
    ;)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top