he was frightened at the deep blue blaze of her eyes, and of her soft stillness, sitting there

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(para. 366) by Lawrence(the University of Adelaide,here):

Again he was frightened at the deep blue blaze of her eyes, and of her soft stillness, sitting there. She had never been so utterly soft and still. She fascinated him helplessly, as if some perfume about her intoxicated him. So he went on helplessly with his reading, and the throaty sound of the French was like the wind in the chimneys to her. Of the Racine she heard not one syllable.

I feel the part in blue is likely to mean:
1.he was frightened at the deep blue blaze of her eyes, and (was frightened) of her soft stillness, sitting there.
2.he was frightened at the deep blue blaze of her eyes, and (frightened at the deep blue blaze) of her soft stillness, sitting there.
Which one is possible please?
Thank you in advance
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I would imagine he did it just for a bit of stylistic variation:) though it could be argued that a blaze is something you're more likely to be frightened at (or by), while softness is something you're more likely to be frightened of (or by) ~ the nuances are infinitesimal:cool:
     
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