He will get himself in trouble before he's done.

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CKM367

Senior Member
Russian
In 'Lamentation' by C. J. Sansom, there is such a fragment:

Paget smiled, a thin line of white teeth in his thick beard. ‘He will get himself in trouble before he's done.’
...
Paget was right, he was a foolish and dangerous man.

What did Paget say? 'He will get himself in trouble' before what? Did he really imply that he (Thomas Seymour) was a foolish and dangerous man?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Paget doesn't imply anything. He said that Thomas Seymour will get himself in trouble before it's all over (whatever "it" is: his life, this affair, whatever).

    It sounds like the story's narrator is the one making the statement, not implication, that Thomas Seymour was a foolish and dangerous man.
     
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