He will have it

NicolaAlocin

Senior Member
Italian
In a short-story I'm reading, the narrator says about his brother:

"No matter to him that in one breath he denies my existence, in the next affirms it with oaths and curses: I am Anchises to his Aeneas, he will have it"

In this context, does the phrase mean "He will/would declare/affirm"?

Thanks,

N.
 
  • hunnybun

    Member
    English
    This sounds like something written quite a while ago. This isn't a phrase you'd see often in contemporary UK English. In this context I think it probably means something like "according to him". It suggests that the brother has made the decision to cast the narrator in this particular role and the narrator isn't too happy about it.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In a short-story I'm reading, the narrator says about his brother:

    "No matter to him that in one breath he denies my existence, in the next affirms it with oaths and curses: I am Anchises to his Aeneas, he will have it"

    In this context, does the phrase mean "He will/would declare/affirm"?

    Thanks,

    N.
    Aeneas carried his father Anchises from the ruins of Troy, unless my memory is playing up, so its an odd thing to say of one's brother. The suggestion is I suppose that he is supporting you.

    I think, Nicola, it means he will have it so, he will have it no other way: in other words he will accept no alternative account of the relationship between them.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Thank you, but why is the phrase in the future form?
    Ah, but it's not in the future form. The construction will + plain verb has various uses, of which future time is of course by far the most common. But will also has certain other uses. Here, it means something like "insist, persist". With a more modern example:

    I've told those children many times, but they will track dirt into the house. (= they always do it)

    Another use is "is very probably", as in 'That will be the postman' when you hear a knock on the door. Neither of these two uses refers to the future.
     

    GerardM

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi NicolaAlocin, hi everyone,
    Thank you, but why is the phrase in the future form?
    As written in previous posts, "will" can have several uses:

    - volition, willingness ie kinda want
    Examples (no future here)-
    Ask who you will.
    I will not be talked to like that.

    - the auxiliary of the future
    Example- The results will be announced on Monday
    - requests
    Example- Will you pass the salt please?
    - invitations
    Example- Will you have a cup of tea?
    - several other different uses

    HTH
     
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