He worked all day, leaving his lunch untouched

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SRPGgamer

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi guys, I would like to ask a question which has been confusing me for a long time.....

"He has worked all day,leaving his lunch untouched."<---is it grammatically correct? but someone told me it doesn't make sense... I am wondering if I am using the latter part of this sentence correctly...and I want to know more of that structure in which a sentence is divided by a comma and followed by a verb starting with "ing" form...

What about the other way round? as in "leaving his lunch untouched,he worked all day"....

I am really confused... I would say thanks in advance..

PS:I was told that I shouldn't put "has" into first sentence which I don't know why..
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I don't know who is telling you these tips; is your advisor a native speaker or a fellow student? Perhaps you are just "better" at English than him!

    Your sentences seem quite sophisticated to me, actually.
     

    Physics Guy

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Agreed, both sentences work. But the has does imply you're speaking the sentence at the end of that day.

    If you're looking back on that day from a later time, don't put the "has" in there. Just use the pure past tense: "He worked all day . . ."
     
    Last edited:

    SRPGgamer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    If compared "leaving his lunch untouched,he worked all day" to "he worked all day,leaving his lunch untouched" <---what's the difference..
     

    Physics Guy

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Only a slight difference.

    The first sentence carries a little more implication that lunch is important for this fellow, and if he misses LUNCH, you knew he worked a very hard and long day.

    But the difference is slight. I actually like the sound of the second sentence better. It highlights that the fellow worked all day, even missing his lunch in the process. I recommend the second sentence.
     

    mtmjr

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    I would say that the difference lies in the cause and effect relationship. Your first example:

    1. Because he left his lunch untouched-->he worked all day.
    2. Because he worked all day-->he left his lunch untouched.

    The second one makes more sense. Also, I would say that the original post, while perhaps grammatically correct, does not sound quite right. I would use either:

    He had worked all day, leaving his lunch untouched.
    or
    He worked all day, leaving his lunch untouched.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    If you're looking back on that day from a later time, don't put the "has" in there. Just use the pure past tense: "He worked all day . . ."
    Yes - good point. This is the only reason your teacher could have for saying you are wrong, if your story is about a day that happened a long time ago.

    You can see from the other exchanges you've had with people in here that usage in English is open to a great deal if subtle variation.

    Good luck with your studies
     
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