he works in CNN, BBC

MedaBeda

Senior Member
Czech
Hello,

If I want to say that some person works as a cleaner/clerk/presenter,... for a company like BBC or CNN, could I say:

He works in BBC.
 
  • pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No, we work “at” a company but “in” a particular division of that company:

    She works at BBC in the world news department as a presenter.

    Hope it helps!
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    We don’t say “the BBC” in US English. Just BBC, like CNN, NBC, ABC, etc.

    I agree that the preposition needs to be “for” or “at,” not “in.”
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Like everyone here, I can only speak from my own experience. It seems like every time I say "We don't say X in US English" rather than "I've personally never come across X in US English" someone comes out with evidence to the contrary. It's Murphy's Law. :D I should just always say "I've never heard" or "I wouldn't use." :D
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Like everyone here, I can only speak from my own experience. It seems like every time I say "We don't say X in US English" rather than "I've personally never come across X in US English" someone comes out with evidence to the contrary. It's Murphy's Law. :D I should just always say "I've never heard" or "I wouldn't use." :D
    :thumbsup:
    (I always try to restrict my comments that way - I've only lived in parts of the US and my memory of BE is getting less reliable for generalizations:))
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm thinking more about that distinction between the professional reporter/presenter working 'for' a company and the cleaner working 'at' its premises, Broadcasting House. The professional is creating the product, whereas the cleaners' and other servicing, maintenance or ancillary workers' focus is the material state of the building, not the organisation occupying it.
    These days cleaners and the rest most likely don't work for the BBC, but for a company the BBC has contracted the work out to. Actually, that's true of many of the professionals who are not contracted to the BBC itself.
    Students deserve the best, most correct information. That's unlikely to be found in the speech of "most" native speakers, regardless of nationality.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I speak AmE and I would say "the BBC" but not "the CNN." Also I put punctuation marks inside quotations, not outside.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Also I put punctuation marks inside quotations, not outside.
    :D:D
    I'm thinking more about that distinction between the professional reporter/presenter working 'for' a company and the cleaner working 'at' its premises, Broadcasting House. The professional is creating the product, whereas the cleaners' and other servicing, maintenance or ancillary workers' focus is the material state of the building, not the organisation occupying it.
    These days cleaners and the rest most likely don't work for the BBC, but for a company the BBC has contracted the work out to. Actually, that's true of many of the professionals who are not contracted to the BBC itself.
    :thumbsup:
     
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