head over

minhduc

Senior Member
vietnamese
Hi all, please tell me the meaning of "head over".

In this context they are playing billiards.

“We’re just about to start a game,” Scott said. “Fifty dollars and you’re in. Grab a cue.”
But before I could head over to the rack, a short man in wire glasses and a sweater vest came up beside Scott.

Thanks
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Head over" means to move in the direction of.

    Ships, for example, move by compass "headings," i.e. directions on a compass and I suspect that's the source of the expression.
     

    fdk47

    Senior Member
    Tagalog
    Hi, I want to learn different ways to use “head over.”


    I think I can say “Let's head over to the beach.” as in “Let's go to the beach.”


    Can I say “How about headding over to the beach?” to make a suggestion to go to the beach?


    Thank you.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Can I say “How about headding heading over to the beach?” to make a suggestion to go to the beach?
    If the beach is a short distance from where you are, yes. If you have to travel for a while to get there, no. (In the example you quoted, remember, the speaker was just walking across the room.) It's the "over" part that suggests the short distance.
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    If the beach is a short distance from where you are, yes. If you have to travel for a while to get there, no. (In the example you quoted, remember, the speaker was just walking across the room.) It's the "over" part that suggests the short distance.
    Yes. Proximity makes all the difference.
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    I disagree that "head over" has any connotation of proximity. I live in Australia and it is quite natural for me to say "We're heading over to England next week" - and that's just about as far as you can go!
     
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