Head rush

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  • Driven

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    When all the blood rushes to your head. It could actually be the opposite. Sometimes if I stand up too fast and I get dizzy because there is no blood to my head yet, I will say, "Wow, I just got a head rush." But it really stands for the blood rushing to your head. (Did I confuse you?)

    I think you can use it when you drink alcohol too. If you drink a shot of something and you get a sensation of a wave going to your head. (I don't drink so I'm not sure about that.)
     

    ddubug

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hi,
    I need help.

    What is 'head rush'?

    <I get a little ethical head rush from volunteering at senior center.>

    << Added to earlier thread. >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It's a thrill, an exciting experience, something that you find exhilarating. One might say after riding a rollercoaster: "What a head rush!" I think it's been around for a while as a saying, though. It seems to me that friends of mine were saying it in the 70s.
     

    hotpocket

    Senior Member
    American English / Boston
    It's a thrill, an exciting experience, something that you find exhilarating. One might say after riding a rollercoaster: "What a head rush!" I think it's been around for a while as a saying, though. It seems to me that friends of mine were saying it in the 70s.
    Well put, JamesM.
    It's also in reference to blood rushing to your head, helping to create the effect of exhiliration -- a bit different from the original example.
     

    Blues Piano Man

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It's a thrill, an exciting experience, something that you find exhilarating. One might say after riding a rollercoaster: "What a head rush!" I think it's been around for a while as a saying, though. It seems to me that friends of mine were saying it in the 70s.
    In my experience, it's almost always just "rush," not "head rush." I heard a lot of that in the 70s, also. I don't think I've ever heard of a foot rush, or arm rush, or any other kind of rush; so "head" isn't needed to convey the meaning.

    I think this is mostly used figuratively. The literal meaning, as I first learned it, refers to the sudden onset (can be within seconds) of the effect of taking a drug via injection into the blood stream.

    Blues :)
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I tend to hear "head rush" rather than just "rush". I wondered whether this was an AE/BE and AusE difference, however the first two pages of search results I got for "head rush" were from the US.

    I've heard it most often referring to the buzzing, dizzy feeling you get in your head after smoking a cigarette, if you're not a regular smoker.

    The first definition at the Urban Dictionary is what I'm talking about. It has more to do with dizziness than elation:

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=head+rush
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    In my experience in the UK we tend to talk about a rush rather than a head rush. A rush to me still makes me think more of a drug related feeling (although not exclusively) and in terms of intensity it is more intense than a buzz.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I understood a head rush to be an intellectual rather than a physical thing.
    So I get a linguistic head rush if my answer to a particularly knotty problem posted here turns out to resolve something that has been puzzling the original poster for days.
    I may have misunderstood.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    The literal meaning, as I first learned it, refers to the sudden onset (can be within seconds) of the effect of taking a drug via injection into the blood stream.
    Blues and I have learned it just a bit differently. I recall first hearing "get a rush" or
    "gives me a rush" when people were describing the effects of smoking marijuana or hashish. Whether the phenomenon results from inhaling or injecting, it's still the effect of some form of brain stimulus.

    Sorry, the etymology doesn't include Jimmy Rushing, who hit his stride with whiskey. :)
     
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