Headland bats with real style and is deadly square of the wicket

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
off
(also off side) Cricket
The half of the field (as divided lengthways through the pitch) towards which the batsman’s feet are pointed when standing to receive the ball. The opposite of leg.
Headland bats with real style and is deadly square of the wicket on the off side.
oxforddictionaries

Explain to me please what it's talking about. The phrase in bold looks to me like a conglomeration of words:(.
Thank you
 
  • wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Headland is a stylish batsman who scores heavily against balls delivered on his right-hand side, by hitting them square of the wicket: that is, at right angles to the bowler's line.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Headland is a stylish batsman who scores heavily against balls delivered on his right-hand side, by hitting them square of the wicket: that is, at right angles to the bowler's line.
    I understand the first half now:).

    is deadly square of the wicket:
    So, square of the wicket = at right angles to the bowler's line... Then, "square of" is an adverb which modifies the wicket?
    If "deadly" is an adverb, modifying "square of the wicket", why is the "is" put before it?:confused:
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    But deadly does not modify square of the wicket, it describes Headland - he is deadly when he hits square of the wicket.
    So:
    with real style and square of the wicket on the off side modify bats
    deadly, an adverb, modifies Headland.
    I'd expect then:
    Headland is deadly, bats with real style and square of the wicket on the off side.
    But in the original:
    Headland bats with real style and is deadly square of the wicket on the off side.
    ..."is deadly" looks like it's in the wrong place...:( I misunderstand something?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    No, it's in the right place and deadly is an adjective*. It is only when he bats square of the wicket that he is deadly. He is not deadly when he bats in other directions, so the deadly must remain associated with "square if the wcket" - if you move it away, it just says he is deadly, which is a different meaning.



    *
    deadly
    adj ( -lier, -liest)
    likely to cause death: deadly poison, deadly combat
    informal extremely boring
    In this figurative use, it means he scores a lot and makes the other team likely to lose (~=die).
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Maybe commas are needed, then...:
    Headland bats with real style and, is deadly, square of the wicket on the off side.
    Would it be more correct?...:confused:
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The original sentence is a complete parallel to
    "Pele played with style and was deadly in front of the goal."
    A comma is not needed there nor in the original sentence.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    One further point about cricket terminology: I explained 'on the off side' as 'against balls delivered on his right-hand side', but this is only true for a right-handed batsman, who takes stance with his left leg forward and his body sideways on to the bowler.

    A left-handed batsman, on the other hand, stands the other way round, with his right leg forward towards the bowler. For the left-hander, the off side is to his left.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Just a tiny point about Julian's comment:
    The original sentence is a complete parallel to
    "Pele played with style and was deadly in front of the goal."
    A comma is not needed there nor in the original sentence.
    If you say Pele was deadly in front of goal, you mean he very often scored when he was in front of goal.

    When you say that Headland, a batsman, was deadly square of the wicket, you do not mean that he was deadly when he was himself square of the wicket.

    A batsman stands in front of one of the two sets of stumps to receive the ball - he isn't square of the wicket - but he can hit the ball square of the wicket, ie. at right-angles to the direction the ball is bowled (to a line from one set of stumps to the other).

    If he's deadly square of the wicket, that means that he hits the ball very effectively and powerfully to the left or right, at a right angle to the direction from which it comes.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    But deadly does not modify square of the wicket, it describes Headland - he is deadly when he hits square of the wicket.
    Just a tiny point about Julian's comment: If you say Pele was deadly in front of goal, you mean he very often scored when he was in front of goal.

    When you say that Headland, a batsman, was deadly square of the wicket, you do not mean that he was deadly when he was himself square of the wicket.

    A batsman stands in front of one of the two sets of stumps to receive the ball - he isn't square of the wicket - but he can hit the ball square of the wicket, ie. at right-angles to the direction the ball is bowled (to a line from one set of stumps to the other).

    If he's deadly square of the wicket, that means that he hits the ball very effectively and powerfully to the left or right, at a right angle to the direction from which it comes.
    TT is right. I had used the Pele example to show the sentence structure, in soccer terms that might be more easily understood than cricket, rather than elaborating on my original comment on where he hits the ball to, rather than from:D
     
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