healthy vs sound

snooprun

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi there!
I was trying to say 'the rapid, sustainable and healthy development of China's economy' , but I find using healthy in this case is a bit awkard, so what is the preferred word here? Is sound an alternative? Which word do you use often to describe robust growth of national economy? Many thanks!
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I was trying to say 'the rapid, sustainable and healthy development of China's economy' , but I find using healthy in this case is a bit awkard, so what is the preferred word here? Is sound an alternative? Which word do you use often to describe robust growth of national economy?
    Why not use robust to describe robust growth?

    But healthy is also possible; I don't see anything awkward about it.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    For me "healthy development" has a value judgement attached to it. We could talk about "unhealthy development" and that would mean that a section of society would suffer as a result.

    I prefer "sound" and "robust"
     

    snooprun

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks you all! One last question, is it natural to say 'China's economy has developed sustainably, rapidly and soundly'? If not, what is the prefered way to say this?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    You are now asking about style, which is a personal thing (a matter of taste).
    Just for the record, I myself would prefer not to use three adverbs together like this, but would write "developed in a sustainable, rapid and sound manner/way".
     

    snooprun

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    You are now asking about style, which is a personal thing (a matter of taste).
    Just for the record, I myself would prefer not to use three adverbs together like this, but would write "developed in a sustainable, rapid and sound manner/way".
    Thanks e2efour, but I am wondering if,idiomatically, this is a received rule to eschew using three consecutive adverbs——if so, is it acceptable to use three adjectives instead—— or a case of personal preference?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I wasn't referring to any rule, but only giving my personal preference. I also think that sound sounds better than soundly, which is not used all that often in the meaning in question. "He beat him soundly" is a more common use of soundly, in my view.
     

    valdemar

    Senior Member
    Español mexicano
    I just foud this thread but I still cannot grassp the difference. Essentially what is the defference between sound and healthy? like for example if I say "I consider my body to be sound/healthy" or "I have a sound/healthy life".
     
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